Corrections

Corrections to our publications

Human Rights Watch strives to maintain the highest level of accuracy in our reporting. We cannot reply individually to all corrections requests, but all such requests that specify the exact nature of the alleged inaccuracy and the publication (title, page number / web address and date) in which it appeared will be reviewed. If you believe you have found an inaccuracy in our materials, please contact us.

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Recent Corrections

  • Clarification

    In this report Human Rights Watch identifies half-a-billion dollars in World Bank financial support for agriculture projects linked to forced and child labor in Uzbekistan. In a social media video summarizing our findings, we used language that may have suggested the funds went exclusively to the cotton sector, where these abuses are concentrated. We have updated language in the video to clarify that the loans involve agriculture projects as stated in the report, news release, and other video materials. These projects directly or indirectly benefit the cotton sector.

  • Egypt: Intensifying Repression of Basic Freedoms

    An earlier version of this news release mistakenly wrote that Egypt had ratified the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in 1986 and has now been corrected to 1982.  

  • Clarification on Afghan Teenager, Deported from Sweden Story

    HRW has removed the dispatch entitled “Afghan Teenager, Deported from Sweden, Killed in Kabul” because there is now conflicting information as to whether this deportee was killed. HRW's concerns about violence in Kabul and the safety of deportation to Afghanistan remain.

  • Media Blocked, Threatened in Dispute with Qatar

    6/14: An earlier version of this news release said that “on May 25, Egypt blocked the websites of 62 media outlets it accused of being favorable toward the Muslim Brotherhood, including Al Jazeera and at least four other Qatari government-linked outlets.” We have corrected this to read as “on May 24, Egypt blocked the websites of 21 media outlets it accused of being favorable toward the Muslim Brotherhood, including Al Jazeera and at least four other Qatari government-linked outlets. The Association for Freedom of Thought and Expression, an independent Egyptian rights group, said the block had grown to 62 sites as of June 12.”

    6/15: An earlier version of this news release incorrectly stated that Saudi Arabia was among that countries that had publicly declared a ban on online criticism of the country’s policy toward Qatar or of expressing sympathy to Qatar. In fact, Saudi authorities have not publicly announced such a ban. The earlier version stated “on June 7 and 8, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates announced that any speech critical of their governments’ measures against Qatar or sympathetic to Qatar would be prosecuted as crimes.” We have corrected it to read as “on June 7 and 8, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain announced that any speech critical of their governments’ measures against Qatar or sympathetic to Qatar would be prosecuted as crimes.” Likewise, an earlier version contained the sentence “On the same day a state-controlled Saudi Arabian media outlet stated that such expression could be considered a cybercrime offense in the kingdom.” This sentence has been removed.  

  • Another Day, Another Bomb in Kabul

    6/1: An earlier version of this news release stated that Germany had returned "thousands" of rejected asylum seekers to Afghanistan, it has been corrected to say "hundreds". 

  • Morocco: Scrap Prison Terms for Nonviolent Speech

    5/9: An earlier version of this news release identified Mustapha Khalfi as the government spokesman. We have corrected his affiliation to read as “government spokesman and delegate minister for relations with the parliament and civil society.”

  • This Is the Man Trump Wants to Meet With

    5/5: An earlier version of this oped misstated the Millennium Challenge Corporation’s policy decision on a future grant to the Philippines. The oped has been changed to reflect this.

  • Thailand: Draft Media Law Threatens News Reporting

    4/29: The original news release stated that the draft law subjects anyone who directly or indirectly earns income from reporting news to the public without a license – and their company, agency, or organization – to up to two years in prison; however, the draft law was amended, increasing the penalty to three years. 

  • Remove Barriers to Syrian Refugee Education

    This news release originally stated that “the latest UNICEF estimates, compiled through an improved enrollment-tracking system” in Jordan, found that fewer Syrian children were enrolled in public schools than had previously been reported. The news release has been corrected to clarify that more accurate school enrollment figures were collected through an improved enrollment-tracking system managed by the government of Jordan, and adds the final sentence to that paragraph. 

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