Corrections

Corrections to our publications

Human Rights Watch strives to maintain the highest level of accuracy in our reporting. We cannot reply individually to all corrections requests, but all such requests that specify the exact nature of the alleged inaccuracy and the publication (title, page number / web address and date) in which it appeared will be reviewed. If you believe you have found an inaccuracy in our materials, please contact us.

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Recent Corrections

  • Libya: At Least 370 Missing From Country's East

    The March 31 news release stated that Maher al-Gerief and two friends, Walid al-Thaib and Khalid al-Mansuri went missing while driving "with weapons" to the front line in Brega. Human Rights Watch has since confirmed that they were travelling without weapons.

  • Yemen: Don't Use Stun Guns on Peaceful Protesters

    The February 13 version of this news release used the term “taser.” That was meant as a generic term for stun gun and did not intend to suggest that Taser-brand products were being used. (February 14, 2011)

  • World Report 2011: Colombia

    The English version of the Colombia chapter of the 2011 World Report incorrectly stated that: "The government does not keep statistics for such cases, but as of May 2010, the Attorney General's Office was investigating 1,366 cases of alleged extrajudicial killings committed by state agents involving more than 2,300 victims. There have only been convictions in 63 cases." The corrected version reads that there have "only been sentences in 63 cases," rather than 63 convictions.

    The English version of the Colombia chapter of the 2011 World Report incorrectly stated that: "The office has opened investigations into more than 1,300 cases (including several hundred that do not appear on the ENS list), but has only obtained convictions in 14 percent of these cases." The missing qualification, "of anti-union" violence, has been added online. The corrected version reads: "The office has opened investigations into more than 1,300 cases of anti-union violence".

    The Spanish translation of the Colombia chapter of the 2011 World Report mistakenly stated that the Colombian government had "assassinated" Víctor Julio Suárez, alias "Mono Jojoy", where the correct English version states that he was killed. We apologize for the mistake and have corrected the language in the Spanish version. The corrected Spanish version reads: "In September 2010 the Colombian military killed top FARC military commander Victor Julio Suárez, alias "Mono Jojoy," responsible for numerous grave abuses during his decades of leadership." (January 25th, 2011)

  • World Report 2011: Mexico

    The English version of the Mexico chapter of the 2011 World Report incorrectly stated that: "According to military authorities, since 2007 only one military officer has been sentenced by military courts for human rights violations." The missing qualification, "during the Calderon administration", has been added online. The corrected version reads: "According to military authorities, since 2007 only one military officer has been sentenced by military courts for human rights violations committed during the Calderon administration."

    The Mexico chapter of the 2011 World Report stated that Human Rights reforms to the constitution had "not yet been approved by the house of deputies". The online version has been modified to reflect that "The House of Deputies passed its own version of the reforms in December." (January 25th, 2011)

  • World Report 2011: Burundi

    The English version of the Burundi chapter of the 2011 World Report incorrectly states that "CNDD-FDD's election campaign relied on bribery and use of state resources, along with intimidation." The missing qualification, "in part", has been corrected online. The corrected version reads that: "CNDD-FDD's election campaign relied in part on bribery and use of state resources, along with intimidation."

  • World Report 2011: Rwanda

    In the French version of the 2011 World Report chapter on Rwanda, the name of the murdered Green Party vice-president was misspelled. The correct spelling is André Kagwa Rwisereka.

  • World Report 2011: Chad

    The English version of the Chad chapter of the 2011 World Report incorrectly states that a joint African Union-Europe Union team presented Senegal with a proposed budget of $9 million for the Hissène Habré trial. The correct proposed budget for the trial is $11.7 million (8.59 million Euros). (January 24, 2011)

  • “We Are a Buried Generation”

    The December 2010 report "We are a Buried Generation" incorrectly names and identifies the Iranian Queer Railroad as the Canada-based rights group that provided Human Rights Watch with information regarding a home raid in the city of Shiraz on July 10, 2010 (p. 50). In fact, it was the Iranian Queer Organization (IRQO), another Canada-based rights group working on LGBT issues that was responsible for providing this information. In addition, footnote 235 incorrectly refers to IRQR as the Iranian Queer Railroad. The correct name of the organization is the Iranian Railroad for Queer Refugees. The report incorrectly names the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Council (IGLHRC) in the acknowledgment section of the report. The correct name of the organization is the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission. (December 22, 2010)

  • Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sudan: End Juvenile Death Penalty

    In an October 8, 2010 news release, Human Rights Watch stated that Mushabbab bin Ali al-Ahmari, who was executed by Saudi Arabia on January 15, 2009, was a juvenile offender. The two English language press accounts on which we relied, however, appear to have mistranslated a Saudi government statement. The Saudi statement said that the government had waited until the heirs of the individual killed by Mushabbab had turned 18, not for Mushabbab himself to turn 18. Our press release has been revised to remove the reference to this case, and to reflect that Saudi Arabia is therefore known to have executed at least two juvenile offenders in 2009. (November 2, 2010)

  • Cambodia: Rainsy Sentence Shatters Pretense of Democracy

    In a September 24, 2010 news release, Human Rights Watch noted that the Rainsy Party was launched in 1998, whereas it was actually launched in 1995. The launch date of the Party has been corrected in the news release. (September 24, 2010)

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