(Moscow) - A civil society activist and her husband were taken from the office of a nongovernmental organization in Grozny, Chechnya on August 10, 2009 by armed men, and their whereabouts are unknown, raising fears that that they may have been "disappeared" in retaliation for the activist's work, Human Rights Watch said today.

Two armed men entered the office of the group, Save the Generation, at about 2 p.m., witnesses said. The men said they were members of the security services and demanded that Zarema Sadulayeva, the head of the organization, and her husband, Alik (Umar) Lechayevich Dzhabrailov, come with them. They did not say where they were taking the couple. They had not been heard from as of 9:30 p.m., and Russian authorities had not responded to inquiries about the couple's whereabouts by the Russian human rights organization Memorial.

"Human Rights Watch is extremely concerned about the fate of Zarema Sadulayeva and Alik Dzhabrailov," said Holly Cartner, Europe and Central Asia director at Human Rights Watch. "The shocking murder of Natalia Estemirova only last month has made it obvious that activists in Chechnya are being targeted for their work and are extremely vulnerable."

Estemirova, a prominent human rights activist and researcher for Memorial in Grozny, was abducted and later found killed on July 15, 2009.

Shortly after Sadulayeva and Dzhabrailov were taken away, the men who had taken them returned to the organization's office and took Dzhabrailov's mobile phone and his car, a gray VAZ 2110, with a license plate ending in 237.

Save the Generation is a nongovernmental organization in Chechnya founded in 2001 that provides psychological and physical rehabilitation to disabled children, orphans, and other socially vulnerable groups. The group also works closely with UNICEF, among other groups, to provide training about landmines, and promotes protection of the rights of the disabled.

"If the authorities have officially detained Sadulayeva and Dzhabrailov, they should reveal their location and the legal basis for holding them and guarantee their rights," Cartner said. "This includes an absolute prohibition on ill-treatment, their right to inform their relatives of their whereabouts, and access to a lawyer of their choosing."

The detention of anyone followed by a refusal to acknowledge this detention, or by concealment of the fate or whereabouts of the detained person, constitutes an enforced disappearance, a crime under international law that is prohibited in all circumstances.