• Since the ousting of the Ben Ali regime in 2011, Tunisians have enjoyed greater freedom of expression, assembly, and association, including the freedom to form political parties. However, several factors hampered the consolidation of rights’ protections. These included the retention of the former regime’s repressive legal arsenal and attempts by the executive branch to control media and prosecute speech offenses. Judicial authorities prosecuted many journalists, bloggers, artists, and intellectuals on account of their peaceful exercise of freedom of expression using penal code provisions criminalizing “defamation,” “offenses against state agents,” and “harming public order,” all of which can result in prison terms.
  • Tunisian authorities should mark the celebration of the country’s new constitution on February 7, 2014, by immediately quashing the sentences of anyone convicted under laws that violate human rights. One of these is Jaber Mejri, a blogger imprisoned since 2012 for publishing caricatures deemed insulting to Islam. Many foreign heads of state and officials, including the President François Hollande of France, will attend the ceremony.

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Tunisia

  • Feb 6, 2014
    Tunisian authorities should mark the celebration of the country’s new constitution on February 7, 2014, by immediately quashing the sentences of anyone convicted under laws that violate human rights. One of these is Jaber Mejri, a blogger imprisoned since 2012 for publishing caricatures deemed insulting to Islam. Many foreign heads of state and officials, including the President François Hollande of France, will attend the ceremony.
  • Feb 3, 2014
    Tunisia’s revolution reached a milestone in late January when it passed a new constitution, setting a new course for the country’s future. The National Constituent Assembly has spent nearly two years of hard work on the document, with a month devoted solely to debating and scrutinizing each and every article.
  • Feb 1, 2014
    The adoption of Tunisia’s new constitution should set in motion a wide-ranging overhaul of laws and public institutions, Al Bawsala, Amnesty International. The constitution, which guarantees many fundamental rights and freedoms, should be implemented in a way that will provide the highest degree of protection of Tunisians’ human rights.
  • Jan 13, 2014
    As Tunisia’s National Constituent Assembly (NCA) is discussing the chapter on the judicial powers in a new constitution, Al Bawsala, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and The Carter Center urge members to strengthen guarantees for judicial independence.
  • Jan 3, 2014

    Tunisia should bring its nearly completed draft constitution in line with international human rights standards and the country’s obligations under international law, four human rights organizations said today. The National Constituent Assembly (NCA) will begin voting on the constitution article by article on January 3, 2014. 

  • Dec 5, 2013
    Tunisia should amend laws governing the arrest, interrogation, and initial detention of suspects, and improve conditions in jails, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Lack of access to a lawyer during arrest and interrogation leaves people vulnerable to mistreatment, and some jails fail to meet basic standards for nutrition, shelter, and hygiene.
  • Nov 5, 2013
    Tunisian authorities should make sure that their investigation into a man’s death shortly after Tunis police arrested him on November 1, 2013, is prompt and thorough.
  • Oct 14, 2013
    Tunisian legislators should elect qualified, independent experts to a new body created to combat and prevent torture. Authorities should give the new authority sufficient resources and the political support it needs to carry out its mandate effectively.
  • Sep 13, 2013
    Tunisian authorities should quash the detention of a prominent activist and the prosecutions of two journalists for expressing their opinions. They are accused of defaming public officials.
  • Sep 5, 2013
    A criminal court sentenced two Tunisian rappers to prison on August 30, 2013, for “insulting the police”. The sentences of a year and nine months in prison, which violate their right to free expression, are the latest in a string of similar prosecutions.