• The leader of Uganda's Lord's Resistance Army rebels, Joseph Kony, surrounded by his officers in Nabanga, Sudan, August 1, 2006.
    Joseph Kony is the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), a Ugandan rebel group that originated in 1987 in northern Uganda among ethnic Acholi communities.

Reports

Joseph Kony - LRA

  • Jul 9, 2012
    Letter from Human Rights Watch to the Central African Republic Minister regarding the investigation into the massacre of 13 Central African citizens near the Ngunguinza gold mine in the Central African Wildlife Adventures (CAWA) hunting concession on or around March 20, 2012.
  • Jul 9, 2012
    The Ugandan rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), carried out attacks from June 21 to 25, 2012, near a remote hunting concession outside Bakouma, in the Central African Republic (CAR). The attackers killed at least two civilians and abducted at least 14 others. The attacks followed killings of 13 civilians in the same area in March.
  • Apr 20, 2012
    8 civil society organizations of the Central African Republic, write to USAID on the situation in the eastern Mbomou and Haut-Mbomou prefectures of the country affected by the LRA. In the letter they ask USAID to support projects to improve communications and road infrastructure in the LRA-affected region. This is not a statement from Human Rights Watch, but we believe it is particularly powerful, especially taking into account the insecurity this region has faced due to the LRA’s significant and continuing abuses over the past few years.
  • Apr 20, 2012
    The Ugandan Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebel group has increased its attacks in the Central African Republic (CAR) since the beginning of 2012, putting civilians in affected areas in need of urgent protection. Attacks also continue in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • Apr 20, 2012
    16 civil society, human rights, and religious groups in northern Congo and Central African Republic call for solidarity with the populations of central Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. In their call, they describe the situation and outline steps that should be taken as part of a multidimensional approach to ending the LRA problem. This is not a statement from Human Rights Watch, but we believe it is particularly powerful, especially taking into account the LRA’s significant and continuing abuses over the past few years extending into northern Congo, eastern Central African Republic, and South Sudan.
  • Apr 4, 2012

    The African Union last month announced a plan to improve coordination to end atrocities by Joseph Kony’s Ugandan rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). Efforts to arrest Kony and other LRA leaders wanted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) and to end LRA abuses are urgently needed. But that is only half of the picture; addressing the legacy of the LRA and Ugandan army abuses is the other. This history of abuse also has implications for US and other foreign support to Ugandan-led arrest operations for Kony. 

  • Mar 21, 2012
    Joseph Kony is the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), a Ugandan rebel group that originated in 1987 in northern Uganda among ethnic Acholi communities.
  • Mar 14, 2012

    In the past week, a 30-minute video about Joseph Kony and his rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), has received more than 90 million internet hits. Viewers of the video now know, if they didn’t before, that he is a wanted man with much blood on his hands. For years Human Rights Watch has investigated the LRA’s horrors, from Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo to the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan. We have visited remote massacre sites and listened to hundreds of victims and survivors who want their stories heard.

  • Mar 12, 2012
    Around the globe, Human Rights Watch has documented the recruitment and use of children as soldiers. Today, child soldiers are fighting in at least 14 countries:
  • Mar 9, 2012
    Human Rights Watch has extensively documented the LRA’s atrocities, uncovering unreported massacres in remote regions and interviewing many victims. We’ve taken our findings to government leaders, pushing for action, and even created a short video postcard bringing the voices and appeals of victims directly to the Obama administration.