• The International Criminal Court (ICC), located in The Hague, is the court of last resort for prosecution of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Its founding treaty, the Rome Statute, entered into force on July 1, 2002. As of July 2013, the ICC had 122 states parties, opened investigations in eight countries, and issued two verdicts (Lubanga case and Ngudjolo case). Over the last decade as the court has gotten up-and-running, it has made significant headway in putting international justice on the map, giving rise to increased expectations wherever the world’s worst crimes occur. This was poignantly demonstrated by the signs held by Syrian anti-government protesters that read “Assad to The Hague,” a reference to abuses of the country’s president. But while the ICC is now the primary address for international criminal accountability, its daunting mandate and world-wide reach have made the flaws in its workings more visible. The governments on which the ICC depends to carry out its mandate have been inconsistent in their support, particularly when it comes to arrests. In June 2012, Fatou Bensouda was sworn in as the court’s new head prosecutor. Arrest warrants are pending for suspects in the Libya, Sudan, Uganda, Cote d’Ivoire, and Congo investigations. The court and its member countries face major challenges in meeting expanded expectations for the court in its second decade.

  • The entrance of the International Criminal Court (ICC).

    July 1 marks the 10th anniversary of the entry into force of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the first permanent international court with a mandate to investigate, charge, and try people suspected of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes worldwide. At the ripe old age of 10, the court has become a high-profile institution on the world stage -- central to nearly every call for international justice for the most serious crimes.

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