• Human Rights Watch considers international justice—accountability for genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity—to be an essential element of building respect for human rights. We actively engage with the work of the International Criminal Court and other international tribunals as well as the efforts of national courts, including in Guinea, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Bosnia, to bring perpetrators of the worst crimes to justice. Human Rights Watch also supports the efforts of national courts to use their domestic laws to try those charged with serious crimes in violation of international law, regardless of where the crimes occurred.

  • Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), Fatou Bensouda briefs the UN Security Council on the situation in Libya on May 13, 2014.

    United Nations Security Council members should use the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor’s briefing on her Libya investigation on November 11, 2014, to express concern about the country’s deteriorating situation. Security Council members should underline the ICC’s ongoing jurisdiction to investigate grave abuses being committed by all sides.

     

Reports

International Justice

  • Jan 20, 2015

    The transfer of a Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is an important opportunity to achieve a measure of justice for crimes committed by the rebel group, Human Rights Watch said. Dominic Ongwen arrived in the Netherlands on January 21, 2015, to face charges of four counts of war crimes and three counts of crimes against humanity committed in 2004 in northern Uganda. 

  • Jan 16, 2015

    Dramatic evidence presented at the trial in Chad of 21 former security agents confirms that torture was systematic during the Hissène Habré dictatorship, from 1982 to 1990.

  • Jan 15, 2015
  • Jan 14, 2015
    The ICC is no guarantee that attacks will cease, but it provides a disincentive, and an avenue of redress.
  • Jan 9, 2015
    The United States, Uganda, and the Central African Republic should ensure the prompt transfer of a rebel Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In 2005, the ICC issued an arrest warrant for Dominic Ongwen for crimes against humanity and war crimes.
  • Jan 9, 2015
    On January 6, 2015, US military advisers supporting the African Union Regional Task Force in the Central African Republic received the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander Dominic Ongwen into custody. The United States, Uganda – the primary contributor to the AU task force – and the Central African Republic should ensure the prompt transfer of Ongwen, believed to be about 34 years old, to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In 2005, the ICC issued an arrest warrant for Ongwen for crimes against humanity and war crimes.
  • Jan 9, 2015
  • Jan 6, 2015
    Past experience suggests warnings that international criminal trials impede peace efforts are overblown. The ICC prosecutor mustn’t politicize her mandate by paying heed to them.
  • Dec 18, 2014
    The Nepal government should ensure more victim participation and improve transparency when selecting candidates for two independent commissions on the country’s decade-long conflict, eight local and international human rights organizations and conflict-era victims groups said in an open letter to Prime Minister Sushil Koirala. The groups, reiterating concerns about the act, said Koirala should narrow the scope of the amnesty powers vested in the commissions and bring them in line with international standards.
  • Dec 17, 2014
    African countries expressed strong support for the International Criminal Court at the 13th Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Statute, African and international organizations present at the session said. The governments showed a more positive picture of Africa’s relationship with the ICC than is often reflected in public debates.