• Cluster munitions pose an immediate threat to civilians during conflict by randomly scattering submunitions or bomblets over a wide area. They continue to pose a threat post-conflict by leaving remnants, including submunitions that fail to explode upon impact becoming de facto landmines. The 2008 Convention on Cluster Munitions prohibits the use, production, transfer, and stockpiling of cluster munitions. It also requires destruction of stockpiles, clearance of areas contaminated by remnants, and victim assistance. More than 110 states have joined the Convention on Cluster Munitions and are working to implement its provisions. 

    Human Rights Watch is a founding member of the Cluster Munition Coalition and contributes to its annual Cluster Munition Monitor report.

     

     

  • Sep 3, 2014
    Countries around the world should enact strong laws to implement the treaty banning cluster munitions, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today at an international meeting of nations party to the treaty.
  • Sep 1, 2014
    Unlawful government and insurgent attacks in and around Luhansk are contributing to rising civilian casualties. According to a morgue doctor in Luhansk, explosive weapons have killed more than 300 civilians in the city since May.

Reports

Cluster Munitions

  • Sep 5, 2014
    Four years have now passed since the Convention on Cluster Munitions entered into force in August 2010 and we are encouraged by the impressive overall compliance witnessed to date.
  • Sep 3, 2014
    Countries around the world should enact strong laws to implement the treaty banning cluster munitions, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today at an international meeting of nations party to the treaty.
  • Sep 2, 2014
    Let us begin by congratulating Belize and the Republic of Congo for becoming the two most recent States Parties. What a great way to start our Meeting! And let us say how pleased we are to be here in San Jose, especially because of the vital leadership role that Costa Rica has played since the beginning of the Oslo Process and throughout the life of the Convention.
  • Sep 1, 2014
    Unlawful government and insurgent attacks in and around Luhansk are contributing to rising civilian casualties. According to a morgue doctor in Luhansk, explosive weapons have killed more than 300 civilians in the city since May.
  • Sep 1, 2014
    Credible evidence has emerged that Islamic State forces used ground-fired cluster munitions in at least one location in northern Syria in recent weeks, Human Rights Watch said today. The use of cluster munitions by non-state actors such as the Islamic State shows the urgent need for Syria and all nations that have not yet done so to join the ban on cluster munitions and destroy their stockpiles.
  • Aug 8, 2014

    The international treaty banning cluster munitions is four years old this month. While Syria’s ongoing use of cluster munitions has kept the issue in the news lately, the reality is that the Convention on Cluster Munitions is making a big difference in saving lives and limbs and curtailing the long-term devastation caused by these weapons.

  • Apr 7, 2014
    The requirement to develop national implementation measures to give full effect to the Convention on Cluster Munitions is absolutely vital, but it has not been given the priority it deserves by many States Parties.
  • Apr 4, 2014
    The Syrian government’s extensive use of cluster munitions has caused numerous casualties, damaged infrastructure, and is resulting in a deadly legacy of explosive remnants of war that will pose dangers to civilians for years to come. Human Rights Watch has identified at least 224 locations in 10 of Syria’s 14 governorates where cluster munitions have been used between July 2012 and March 2014.
  • Feb 19, 2014

    Syrian government forces are using a powerful type of cluster munition rocket not seen before in the conflict, Human Rights Watch said today. The new use of cluster munitions is causing civilian casualties and adding to the country’s already devastating legacy of unexploded ordnance.

  • Feb 14, 2014
    The governments of South Sudan and Uganda should investigate new evidence that banned cluster bombs have been used in the South Sudan conflict, Human Rights Watch said today. United Nations (UN) experts found remnants of the weapons, including intact unexploded submunitions or “bomblets,” in the week of February 7, 2014, near the town of Bor in an area not known to be contaminated by remnants prior to mid-December 2013.