• Map of Mining Licenses in Tete Province, Mozambique
    Many of the 1,429 households resettled to make way for Vale and Rio Tinto’s international coal mining operations in Tete province, Mozambique have faced serious disruptions in their access to food, water, and work. The Mozambican government’s speed in approving mining licenses and inviting billions of dollars in investment has outstripped the creation of adequate safeguards to protect directly affected populations.

Reports

Mozambique

  • Nov 28, 2013
    With the holiday season fast approaching, many people will be shopping for jewellery gifts. This is a good moment to ask whether the necklaces, rings, and earrings that will be given to loved ones this festive season have been produced responsibly.
  • Jul 2, 2013
    Human Rights Watch welcomes the opportunity to comment further on the Code of Practices of the Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC), as part of the final review period of the Code of Practices. We are also participating in the RJC’s multi-stakeholder Standards Committee, which deals with the review; however, we wish to make clear that participation in the Committee does not constitute an endorsement of the Code of Practices.
  • May 28, 2013
    From Australia to Mozambique, Indian mining firms are taking the lead on lucrative, globally important projects. But some of these opportunities come with serious human rights risks that could threaten both the reputation and financial health of Indian companies.
  • May 23, 2013
    Many of the 1,429 households resettled to make way for Vale and Rio Tinto’s international coal mining operations in Tete province, Mozambique have faced serious disruptions in their access to food, water, and work. The Mozambican government’s speed in approving mining licenses and inviting billions of dollars in investment has outstripped the creation of adequate safeguards to protect directly affected populations.
  • Sep 17, 2012
  • Mar 29, 2011
    The Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) should publicly press President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe and his party to end their harassment and arbitrary arrests of civil society activists and political opponents. The SADC is meeting beginning March 31, 2011, in Livingstone, Zambia.
  • Aug 31, 2009
    Southern African leaders should press Zimbabwe's power-sharing government to end ongoing human rights violations and to implement legal reforms.
  • Aug 18, 2008
    For years now, women’s groups in Southern Africa have campaigned tirelessly to ensure that the Southern African Development Community adopt the Protocol on Gender and Development. Yesterday, the SADC finally took that historic step. Member states will be obliged to amend their laws to ensure equal rights for women across a wide range of issues, from provisions that require member states to enshrine equality in their constitutions, to firm commitments to reduce maternal mortality by 75 per cent. But while that’s a cause for celebration, the Protocol still does not refer explicitly to domestic violence, and it still doesn’t oblige states to introduce legal provisions that criminalise marital rape.
  • Aug 14, 2008
    Southern African leaders should adopt the proposed Gender and Development Protocol at their upcoming summit after amending it to include crucial provisions deleted in 2007. One of the most important provisions that should be put back in to the protocol would commit states to criminalize marital rape.
  • Jun 5, 2008
    The South African government should ensure that “temporary shelter sites” for homeless and traumatized victims of recent xenophobic violence comply with international standards, Human Rights Watch said today. The UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement require states to provide food, water, shelter, medical care and security to displaced persons.