• Displacement site at Yaloké, where 509 ethnic Peuhl Muslims are housed in government buildings in the town center in deplorable conditions.
    United Nations Security Council members on a first visit to the Central African Republic beginning March 9, 2015, should publicly denounce ongoing attacks against civilians, including Muslims trapped in enclaves.

Reports

Central African Republic

  • Apr 24, 2015

    The court, as set out in the law, will be a hybrid judicial mechanism made up of Central African and international judges within the Central African justice system for a renewable five-year period. The court will have a Central African president and an international special prosecutor. There will be a majority of national judges.

  • Apr 22, 2015
    At least 42 Muslim Peuhl herders, mostly women and girls, are being held captive by anti-balaka fighters in the Central African Republic and are at risk of sexual violence. There are reports that many others may also be held. United Nations peacekeepers and the government should urgently act to free them.
  • Mar 8, 2015
    United Nations Security Council members on a first visit to the Central African Republic beginning March 9, 2015, should publicly denounce ongoing attacks against civilians, including Muslims trapped in enclaves.
  • Feb 20, 2015
    The interim parliament for the Central African Republic is about to consider a bill to establish a Special Criminal Court to complement the work of the International Criminal Court in the country and speed up justice for victims of atrocities since the current conflict began three years ago. This is why the bill needs and deserves support from members of the transition parliament.
  • Feb 20, 2015
    The Central African Republic’s transitional parliament should adopt a draft law establishing a Special Criminal Court, 19 Central African and International groups said today. Such a court would speed up justice for victims of atrocities in the country.
  • Jan 27, 2015
  • Jan 20, 2015

    The transfer of a Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is an important opportunity to achieve a measure of justice for crimes committed by the rebel group, Human Rights Watch said. Dominic Ongwen arrived in the Netherlands on January 21, 2015, to face charges of four counts of war crimes and three counts of crimes against humanity committed in 2004 in northern Uganda. 

  • Jan 20, 2015
  • Jan 9, 2015
    The United States, Uganda, and the Central African Republic should ensure the prompt transfer of a rebel Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In 2005, the ICC issued an arrest warrant for Dominic Ongwen for crimes against humanity and war crimes.
  • Jan 9, 2015
    On January 6, 2015, US military advisers supporting the African Union Regional Task Force in the Central African Republic received the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander Dominic Ongwen into custody. The United States, Uganda – the primary contributor to the AU task force – and the Central African Republic should ensure the prompt transfer of Ongwen, believed to be about 34 years old, to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In 2005, the ICC issued an arrest warrant for Ongwen for crimes against humanity and war crimes.