March 5, 2005
March 5, 2005
Instead of shifting the problem to someone else's community, we need to understand that sex offenders who have been released from prison are members of our communities and have human rights, no matter how heinous their crimes.
Corinne Carey, U.S. Program researcher

Sex offenders are pushed from one town to another, one county to another and now, via Operation Predator, from one nation to another ("Immigrant sex offenders targeted; Operation Predator too broad, critics say," Page 1, Feb. 24). But whatever the mileage, exporting offenders does not solve the problem of child sexual assault.

Instead of shifting the problem to someone else's community, we need to understand that sex offenders who have been released from prison are members of our communities and have human rights, no matter how heinous their crimes.

Zero-tolerance policies like Operation Predator that strip offenders of basic human rights do not protect children, or anyone else.

Public officials and the public they serve should focus more on promoting programs that make sex offenders accountable to their communities instead of pandering to fear and public hysteria by pushing them into dangerous margins.

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