• October 30, 2014
    In Geneva over the next two weeks, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) will play an influential role on the Governing Body of the International Labour Organisation (ILO). Yet Human Rights Watch (HRW) has documented how within the UAE migrant domestic workers are exploited by employers and recruiters, while government policies create conditions which foster abuse and forced labour.
  • October 30, 2014
  • October 29, 2014
  • October 28, 2014
    Mexico, like much of the developing world, is facing a growing public health challenge – more people will be dying from chronic illnesses like cancer, heart disease and diabetes that often cause extreme pain. In 2009, Mexico passed a progressive law granting patients given less than six months to live access to palliative care, which focuses on treating pain and other symptoms. Palliative care is relatively low costAnchor – medicines such as morphine costs pennies per dose, although training staff can be more costly – and it can allow people to re-engage with life and pass away with dignity. Despite this law, little changed for Mexico’s terminally ill – at least at first. Associate Health Director Diederik Lohman talks about how Mexico came to embrace the necessity of pain relief, his work on palliative care around the world, and how it can give the terminally ill an opportunity for joy and meaning at the end of life.
  • October 28, 2014
  • October 27, 2014
    UK officials are probably breathing a sigh of relief over the case of radical Islamic preacher Omar Othman, better known as Abu Qatada. After 12 years of court battles to deport him to Jordan and prolonged detentions in the UK and Jordan, Abu Qatada was acquitted and freed there allowing Home Secretary Theresa May to assert that “due process” had taken place in Jordan.
  • October 27, 2014
    After a three-year legal battle to clear her name, the Oktyabrski District Court of Krasnoyarsk, a Siberian city 4,000 kilometers east of Moscow, on October 21 dropped charges of illegal drug trafficking and document forgery against Dr. Khorinyak, and a friend of the bed-ridden patient who took the medicine to him.
  • October 27, 2014
    The kidnapping of nearly 300 schoolgirls from Chibok, Nigeria by the Islamist militant group Boko Haram last ApriAnchorl shocked the world. A social media campaign – #BringBackOurGirls – became the international rallying cry for their release. Sadly, these aren’t the first, or the last, girls to be kidnapped by Boko Haram – it has become a standard part of the group’s violent insurgency in northeastern Nigeria. The Human Rights Watch Nigeria researcher Mausi Segun spent months tracking down the few girls who escaped from Boko Haram and were courageous enough to share their experiences.
  • October 27, 2014
  • October 24, 2014
    In December 2012, Sadiyah A. (her real name is withheld for her security) migrated from the Philippines to the United Arab Emirates to work as a babysitter. One year later, she sat before me in Abu Dhabi telling me that the job turned out to be no golden opportunity.
  • October 24, 2014
    Human Rights Watch has over 160 staff tweeting human rights developments from around the world. Here are some of their most popular tweets from the last seven days.
  • October 24, 2014
    Dialogue on North Korea's abuses is increasing - and so is talk of action; are President Paul Kagame's admirers ignoring the dark side of his leadership in Rwanda?; and a statement on Burma's stalled reform process sends a clear message - these were among the most popular posts to Dispatches...
  • October 24, 2014
  • October 24, 2014
    The traffic on the road to Tuz Khurmato, a town about an hour south of Kirkuk, was light on a recent morning when we set out to meet senior officials from the Kurdish security forces, the pesh merga. Their fortified bases, lean-tos flying various Shiite militia flags and makeshift camps for displaced families dotted the side of the highway. Official Iraqi security forces were nowhere to be seen, even at checkpoints.
  • October 23, 2014
    “I decided to travel abroad for work to build a house,” Tahira told me. With few options for work in her village in Subang district, West Java, the 28-year-old migrated to the United Arab Emirates in 2012 to become a domestic worker. She had high hopes of making enough money there to support her husband and young son at home in Indonesia. But her dream quickly became a nightmare.
  • October 23, 2014
    Almost 150,000 female domestic workers are employed in the UAE. Most are Asian, but increasing numbers are from East Africa. While some find employers who treat them well and pay them on time, major gaps in the UAE’s labour laws and restrictive immigration policies — coupled with unethical recruitment in home countries — foster an environment that is ripe for exploitation and abuse.
  • October 23, 2014
  • October 22, 2014
  • October 21, 2014
    "[The trial] lasted an hour and a half... The judge in the case is supposed to issue his ruling next week. I hope that next week, by this time, my nightmare will be over and my daughter will be in my arms. Pray for me."
  • October 21, 2014
    In 2006, Time named Jamaica the most homophobic country on earth. Whether that report was accurate or not, violence against LGBT people in Jamaica today is rampant. Police, schools, and hospitals discriminate against LGBT people in Jamaica. But attitudes are shifting and a heated public debate about LGBT rights is taking place within the government, in churches, and in both blogs and the mainstream media.
  • October 21, 2014
  • October 20, 2014
    Prime Minister Tony Abbott had the opportunity to restart his "more Jakarta, less Geneva" foreign policy when he attended the inauguration of Indonesia's new president, Joko "Jokowi" Widodo yesterday.
  • October 20, 2014
    My colleagues and I were supposed to meet a human rights lawyer in his Kathmandu office late last month, but when we got there, we found him surrounded by distraught victims of Nepal’s decade-long civil war between government forces and Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) combatants.
  • October 20, 2014
  • October 17, 2014
    A video captures Hong Kong police taking a more violent approach in reacting to the ongoing "Occupy Central" protests; A homophobic bill in Kyrgyzstan signals more discrimination toward its LGBT community; and schools are being burned in Thailand, but where is the UN? - these were among the most popular posts to Dispatches...
  • October 17, 2014
    They’re going to need an extra-big stage in Oslo this year. When Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai pick up their Nobel Peace Prizes, there are going to be a lot of other winners standing alongside them. About 2.2 billion, in fact.
  • October 15, 2014
    The US Justice Department’s $30 million settlement deal with the eldest son of Equatorial Guinea’s president, announced on October 10, marks the end of a decade-long US effort to pursue Teodoro (“Teodorín”) Nguema Obiang Mangue for corruption and money-laundering. Under the settlement, Teodorín will have to forfeit to the US some of the funds the Justice Department says he “shamelessly looted.” He agreed to pay without admitting any wrongdoing.
  • October 14, 2014
  • October 14, 2014
    More than a decade ago, I accompanied Kailash Satyarthi on one of his rescues. It was dusk when we drove into a dusty village in eastern Uttar Pradesh and made our way into a carpet factory, which was really a mud hut with some looms.
  • October 10, 2014
  • October 10, 2014
    On October 11, National Coming Out Day around the world, lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people will seize the opportunity to speak about their coming out and the importance of equality and non-discrimination. Their visibility might inspire other LGBT people to throw open their closet door and start a life without hiding their sexual orientation. Often a coming out feels like a liberation for LGBT people. Many cannot imagine a life in secrecy and denial anymore.
  • October 10, 2014
    A court order finally addresses the secrecy at Guantanamo; a suicide bombing in Pakistan signals a worrying climate for the Shia community there; and the one-year anniversary of the shipwreck off Lampedusa is time to reflect on the EU's efforts to prevent more from happening - these were among the most popular posts to Dispatches...
  • October 10, 2014
    When I visited the small-scale — or “galamsey” — gold mines in the Ashanti Region earlier this year, I met “Kwame,” a quiet but self-assured 12-year-old. He dropped out of primary school about a year ago to help his mother feed his five younger siblings.
  • October 10, 2014

    The European Union staunchly supports the International Criminal Court. It advocates universal ICC membership to extend the reach of justice for grave abuses and to contribute to “peace and the strengthening of international security.” Yet EU member states are pressing Palestine not to seek ICC membership.

  • October 10, 2014
  • October 9, 2014
  • October 9, 2014
    The October 9 visit by Kazakhstan’s president, Nursultan Nazarbaev, to Brussels will serve as a pointed reminder of the European Union’s colossal failure to secure human rights improvements as part of its engagement with this government, whose human rights record has gone from bad to worse in recent years.
  • October 8, 2014
    The United States government made a mistake this month in relaxing a ban on lethal arms sales and transfers to Vietnam — a non-democratic, one-party state with an abysmal human rights record.
  • October 8, 2014
  • October 7, 2014
    In February, the World Bank delayed a $90 million loan for health care in Uganda out of concern over its new Anti-Homosexuality Act. Since then, the Constitutional Court nullified the law for lack of a parliamentary quorum during the vote. But the government quickly filed a notice of appeal. Members of parliament are also pressing to bring the law back to the floor, swearing they can gather the constitutionally-required numbers.
  • October 7, 2014
    The depiction by Azerbaijan’s foreign minister of summer 2014“as a particularly dark time” in an October 2 speech at the Council of Europe couldn’t have been more fitting to describe the state of human rights in his own country.
  • October 7, 2014
  • October 6, 2014
  • October 6, 2014
    On his way to the opening of the UN General Assembly in New York last month, President Barack Obama stopped at the Clinton Global Initiative, where he announced a ban on U.S. use of antipersonnel landmines everywhere except the Korean Peninsula due to its “unique circumstances.” He pledged, “We’re going to continue to work to find ways that would allow us to ultimately comply fully and accede to the Ottawa Convention,” as the U.S. government prefers to call the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty.
  • October 6, 2014
  • October 5, 2014
    Myanmar recently confirmed to the United Nations that it is on the verge of completing a plan that would grant Rohingya Muslims citizenship if they change their ethnicity to suggest Bangladeshi origin.
  • October 3, 2014
    President Obama has the clout to get child soldiers off the battlefields in countries around the world. But he has been too reluctant to use it. As the fiscal year ended on Sept. 30, he gave some countries a pass to get U.S. military aid—in some cases millions of dollars – that he should have held back until they change their ways.
  • October 3, 2014
    A political earthquake in Hong Kong, the right to water in Detroit, and a grim anniversary on the Mediterranean- these were among the most popular posts to Dispatches, our daily forum for breaking human rights news and commentary.
  • October 3, 2014
    In mid-September a London-based public relations agency made an appeal to “Free Gulnara NOW,” claiming that Gulnara Karimova, daughter of Uzbek president Islam Karimov, was “under house arrest” and “being held for purely political reasons.
  • October 3, 2014