• Dec 17, 2013

    In 2013, President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner secured passage of legislation that severely undermined judicial independence, although the Supreme Court subsequently struck down some of its key aspects. A vibrant but increasingly polarized debate exists in Argentina between the government and its critics. However, the Fernández administration has sanctioned individuals for publishing unofficial inflation statistics challenging official ones, and has failed to adopt rules regarding the distribution of public advertising funds. There is no national law regulating access to information.    

  • Jan 31, 2013
    Argentina continues to make significant progress in prosecuting military and police personnel for enforced disappearances, killings, and torture during the country’s “Dirty War” between 1976 and 1983, although trials have been subject to delays.
  • Jan 22, 2012
    Argentina continues to make significant progress prosecuting military and police personnel for enforced disappearances, killings, and torture during the country’s “dirty war” between 1976 and 1983, although trials have been subject to delays. Argentina adopted comprehensive legislation to regulate broadcast and print media in 2009, and was still in 2011 considering bills to promote access to information. The impact of this legislation on freedom of expression will depend on how it is implemented by a new regulatory body established in the law. Significant ongoing human rights concerns include deplorable prison conditions, torture, and arbitrary restrictions on women’s reproductive rights.
  • Jan 24, 2011
    Argentina continues to make significant progress in prosecuting military and police personnel for “disappearances,” killings, and torture during the country’s “dirty war” in the 1980s, although trials have been subject to delays.
  • Jan 20, 2010
    Argentina has made significant progress in prosecuting military and police personnel responsible for “disappearances,” killings, and torture during the country’s “dirty war.” Despite delays in judicial proceedings, 44 officials have been convicted for committing abuses since Congress annulled the amnesty laws of the 1980s.
  • Jan 13, 2009
    Argentina has taken important steps to bring to justice former military and police personnel accused of having committed grave human rights violations during the country's "dirty war." Since the Supreme Court struck down the "Full Stop" and "Due Obedience" laws in 2005, several police and military officials have been convicted.
  • Jan 31, 2006
    Violence in Argentina’s overcrowded prisons worsened in 2005. Guard brutality, which has been especially well documented in Buenos Aires province, is widespread and shows no signs of diminishing. Violence in Argentina’s overcrowded prisons worsened in 2005. Guard brutality, which has been especially well documented in Buenos Aires province, is widespread and shows no signs of diminishing.
  • Jan 31, 2005
    Serious problems continue to beset Argentina’s criminal justice system. These include police abuses, prison overcrowding, torture of detainees, and degrading conditions of detention in police lockups. Under strong public pressure to deal more effectively with violent urban crime, the government of President Néstor Kirchner passed laws in 2003 increasing the use of pretrial detention and lengthening jail sentences for violent offenders. On a positive note, the Kirchner government continues to press for accountability for human rights violations committed during Argentina’s period of military rule (1976-1983). At this writing, roughly one hundred former military and police officers had been detained, and several key trials were underway.