• Whether it is an oil company that relies on abusive private security forces, a tech company that censors or spies on users at the behest of a repressive government, or a corrupt government that siphons off the wealth of its nation, businesses and other economic activities can have negative impacts on people’s rights. Human Rights Watch investigates these and other situations to expose the problems, hold institutions accountable, and develop standards to prevent these activities. This work has included research and advocacy on human rights problems caused by corruption in resource-rich countries such as Equatorial Guinea, Angola, Nigeria, and Burma.
  • A row of partially complete, unoccupied houses in the resettlement community in Nurabod district.
    The Tajikistan government has shortchanged hundreds of families resettled to make way for a large-scale hydroelectric dam. Despite government commitments to comply with international standards on resettlement that protect the rights of those displaced, it has not provided the necessary compensation to displaced families to replace their homes or restore their livelihoods.
  • Without Rules: A Failed Approach to Corporate Accountability

    By Christopher Albin-Lackey, senior researcher

    Some of the most powerful and sophisticated actors on the world stage are companies, not governments. In 2011 alone, oil and gas behemoth ExxonMobil generated revenues of US$467 billion—the size of Norway’s entire economy. Walmart, the world’s third-largest employer with more than 2 million workers, has a workforce that trails only the militaries of the United States and China in size.

    Many global businesses are run with consideration for the well-being of the people whose lives they touch. But others—whether through incompetence or by design—seriously harm the communities around them, their workers, and even the governments under which they work.

    Read the full essay >>

Reports

Business

  • Jul 16, 2014
  • Jul 2, 2014
  • Jul 2, 2014
    President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo of Equatorial Guinea should immediately release an unjustly imprisoned Italian citizen and ensure he gets prompt medical treatment. Roberto Berardi, a former business partner of President Obiang’s eldest son, has been in custody since January 2013 in an apparent effort to prevent him from disclosing information about the son. Berardi has become seriously ill yet has been denied medical treatment.
  • Jul 1, 2014
    World Bank President Jim Kim has taken some steps to advance the Bank’s respect for human rights but hasn't put in place adequate checks to guard against funding rights abuse, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today on his second anniversary as World Bank president.
  • Jul 1, 2014
    Since Jim Yong Kim took office as the president of the World Bank Group on July 1, 2012, he has overseen meaningful advances in tackling discrimination, in certain instances improved its analysis of and response to human rights risks, and worked to learn from the Group’s past mistakes. To be effective, these advances need to be broadened and institutionalized.
  • Jul 1, 2014
  • Jun 27, 2014
    Saudi Arabia’s government should clarify whether it is infecting and monitoring mobile phones with surveillance malware. Saudi officials should also say whether and how they intend to protect the rights of those targeted to privacy and free expression.
  • Jun 26, 2014
    The Tajik government says it desperately needs Rogun, which will be one of the world’s tallest dams, to meet its electricity needs. But its reservoir will displace over 42,000 people from small mountain villages upstream from the dam site. Khorsheed, whose name has been changed, and many others I interviewed about the project said their situation is dire.
  • Jun 25, 2014
    Global leaders visiting Equatorial Guinea for an African Union summit should call on the government of President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo to improve its human rights record and urgently address corruption.
  • Jun 25, 2014
    The Tajikistan government has shortchanged hundreds of families resettled to make way for a large-scale hydroelectric dam. Despite government commitments to comply with international standards on resettlement that protect the rights of those displaced, it has not provided the necessary compensation to displaced families to replace their homes or restore their livelihoods.