• Since ousting its autocratic president in January 2011, Tunisia has opened political space and held relatively free and fair elections. It advanced human rights by adopting a pluralist election law, joining the International Criminal Court and removing almost all its reservations on accepting international standards on women’s rights. It has freed media outlets from draconian restrictions and allowed people to create and join political parties and to demonstrate peacefully. However, surviving repressive provisions in the press and penal codes are still used at times in political trials and reforms to create an independent judiciary are moving too slowly.

  • Tunisian legislators should drop problematic provisions from a new security bill, 13 nongovernmental organizations said in a joint statement today. Provisions of the bill that are inconsistent with international human rights standards and rights guaranteed in the Tunisian Constitution could criminalize the conduct of journalists, whistleblowers, human rights defenders, and others who criticize the police, and would allow security forces to use deadly force when it is not strictly necessary to protect lives.

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Tunisia

  • May 19, 2015
    Tunisian authorities should conduct a prompt, thorough, and impartial investigation into the death in custody of a man who accused police of torturing him during an earlier arrest.
  • May 13, 2015
    Tunisian legislators should drop problematic provisions from a new security bill, 13 nongovernmental organizations said in a joint statement today. Provisions of the bill that are inconsistent with international human rights standards and rights guaranteed in the Tunisian Constitution could criminalize the conduct of journalists, whistleblowers, human rights defenders, and others who criticize the police, and would allow security forces to use deadly force when it is not strictly necessary to protect lives.
  • May 5, 2015
  • May 1, 2015
    Officials from the internationally recognized Libyan government said in a statement on April 29, 2015, that two Tunisian journalists who had been missing in eastern Libya since September 2014 had been killed.
  • Apr 8, 2015
    The Tunisian government’s new draft counterterrorism law would permit extended incommunicado detention, weaken due process guarantees for people charged with terrorism offenses, and allow the death penalty, Human Rights Watch said today in a report outlining the concerns sent to Tunisian legislators.
  • Apr 8, 2015
  • Mar 27, 2015
  • Mar 18, 2015
    The despicable attack in the Bardo Museum in Tunis on March 18, 2015, killing at least 22 foreign tourists and Tunisians, will test efforts by the Tunisian authorities to build a rights-respecting society, Human Rights Watch said today. No one has yet claimed responsibility for the assault at the museum, much visited by tourists because of its rich archaeological collection.
  • Mar 3, 2015
  • Jan 12, 2015
    Tunisian efforts to ensure accountability for unlawful killings committed during the uprising four years ago were blighted by legal and investigative problems and failed to deliver justice for the victims.