• Tunisia’s promising constitution contained several weaknesses and ambiguities, which could be used to suppress rights such as freedom of expression. In 2014, two radio stations were suspended on accusations of having links to terrorism and propagating hate speech. Incidents of prosecutions for alleged defamation of state officials were fewer. Legal codes retained discriminatory provisions that deny women full equality in family law matters. Torture reportedly remained common in detention facilities and prisons despite Tunisia’s promise to prevent torture and other forms of cruel and inhumane punishment.
  • People hold up pictures of relatives who died in protests during the January 2011 revolution, at a demonstration outside a military court in Tunis June 26, 2012
    Tunisian efforts to ensure accountability for unlawful killings committed during the uprising four years ago were blighted by legal and investigative problems and failed to deliver justice for the victims.

Featured Content

Reports

Tunisia

  • Jan 12, 2015
    Tunisian efforts to ensure accountability for unlawful killings committed during the uprising four years ago were blighted by legal and investigative problems and failed to deliver justice for the victims.
  • Jan 6, 2015

    A Tunisian blogger has been imprisoned after the Tunis military court sentenced him to a three-year term for “defaming the army” and “insulting military high command” through Facebook posts.

  • Dec 4, 2014
    A Tunisian police union leader accused of defaming the army has been sentenced to two years in prison. The military first instance tribunal in Tunis imposed the sentence on Sahbi Jouini on November 18, 2014, after conducting an in-absentia trial without notifying him in advance.
  • Oct 13, 2014

    – Tunisian authorities should conduct a thorough and impartial investigation into the death of a man on October 3, 2014 who was allegedly tortured and abused during his arrest. Relatives of Mohamed Ali Snoussi who viewed his body told Human Rights Watch that he had injuries on the back of his head and bruising on his back, arms, and legs. Human Rights Watch viewed photographs showing the injuries.

  • Oct 1, 2014
    In Kasserine's graveyard two new tombstones have been added to the roll of people who have died a violent death in this Tunisian city close to the Algerian border. Ahlem Dalhoumi, 22, and her cousin Ons Dalhoumi, 18, were both killed with bullets to the head the night of August 23 on their way home from a party with five other family members.
  • Sep 30, 2014
    Political parties and candidates competing in Tunisia’s October 26, 2014, parliamentary elections should describe how they will promote human rights and legal and other reforms if elected.
  • Sep 30, 2014
  • Sep 3, 2014
    Tunisian authorities should conduct a thorough, independent investigation into the fatal shooting by police of two young women on August 23, 2014. Any officers found to have used lethal fire unlawfully should be held accountable.
  • Aug 12, 2014
    The Tunisian government’s suspension of more than 150 organizations across the country for alleged links to terrorism was disproportionate and arbitrary. On July 22, 2014, a government spokesperson said the authorities had issued suspension notices to 157 associations. The government has also closed two radio stations, on similar grounds.
  • Jul 8, 2014
    The Tunisian government should reinstate judges summarily dismissed by the previous justice minister on May 28, 2012. An administrative court has ruled on 30 of the 75 cases since December 2013, ordering their reinstatement, but the government has not acted.