The International Criminal Court (ICC) is a court of last resort for the prosecution of serious international crimes, including genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Its treaty, the Rome Statute, was adopted in July 1998. The court began work in 2003, following ad hoc tribunals set up in the 1990s to deal with atrocity crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. 20 years after the Rome Statute, the ICC has made significant headway in bringing global attention to accountability. But it has faced setbacks, and as human rights crises marked by international crimes continue to proliferate, its mandate has proven to be both more needed and more daunting than its founders envisioned. To be effective, the court and its member countries will need to rise to the challenge.  

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    The Undersigned Organizations have taken note of the possible extension of the shortlist of candidates for the next ICC prosecutor, as produced by the Committee on the Election of the Prosecutor (CEP). Our organizations are concerned regarding the deviation this represents from the Terms of Reference for the election of the prosecutor as adopted by the Bureau in April. We are writing to urge States Parties to ensure that the process focuses only on merit if additional individuals are considered, and ensures an equal assessment of all candidates and transparency of the deliberations.
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    ICC permanent premises
    US: Lawsuit Challenges ICC Sanctions
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    ICC permanent premises
    Joint Civil Society Statement

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