• India has significant human rights problems despite making commitments to tackle some of the most prevalent abuses. There are increased restrictions on Internet freedom; continued marginalization of Dalits, tribal groups, religious minorities, sexual and gender minorities, and people with disabilities; and persistent impunity for abuses linked to insurgencies, particularly in Maoist areas, Jammu and Kashmir, Manipur, and Assam. Many children remain at risk of abuse and deprived of education. India’s free media, vibrant civil society, and independent judiciary often act as checks on abusive practices but reluctance to hold public officials to account for abuses or dereliction of duty fosters a culture of corruption and impunity. India continues to use laws to stifle dissent by restricting access to foreign funding for domestic nongovernmental organizations that are critical of the government.

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  • Demonstrators stand in their boats in the Bay of Bengal during a protest near the Kudankulam nuclear power project in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu on October 8, 2012.

    Authorities in India should stop using sedition and other laws against activists and protesters who have peacefully opposed a nuclear power plant in Tamil Nadu state, Human Rights Watch said today. In the latest incident, immigration officials on September 16, 2014, prevented the environmental activist S.P. Udayakumar from traveling out of the country because of various cases filed against him for leading protests at the Kudankulam nuclear power plant.

Reports

India

  • Oct 17, 2014
    They’re going to need an extra-big stage in Oslo this year. When Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai pick up their Nobel Peace Prizes, there are going to be a lot of other winners standing alongside them. About 2.2 billion, in fact.
  • Oct 14, 2014
    More than a decade ago, I accompanied Kailash Satyarthi on one of his rescues. It was dusk when we drove into a dusty village in eastern Uttar Pradesh and made our way into a carpet factory, which was really a mud hut with some looms.
  • Oct 10, 2014
  • Sep 29, 2014
    Ceremony and cliché will abound as India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, visits Washington on September 29-30 to meet with President Barack Obama at the White House. There will be photo ops, gifts, and recitations about the leader of the world's largest democracy sitting with the leader of the world's oldest. But substantive matters are also to be discussed: Business. Weapons deals. Counterterrorism. Human rights and regional security issues will also be on the table.
  • Sep 23, 2014
    Authorities in India should stop using sedition and other laws against activists and protesters who have peacefully opposed a nuclear power plant in Tamil Nadu state, Human Rights Watch said today. In the latest incident, immigration officials on September 16, 2014, prevented the environmental activist S.P. Udayakumar from traveling out of the country because of various cases filed against him for leading protests at the Kudankulam nuclear power plant.
  • Sep 16, 2014
    Dr. M. R. Rajagopal is a leading palliative care physician from India who, for more than 20 years, has battled conditions that cause patients to suffer severe pain unnecessarily.
  • Aug 25, 2014
    A decade ago, Lalibai, then a mother of four, took a stand and refused to remove and dispose of excrement from her village’s dry toilets, work she inherited at age 12. She had been approached by grassroots activists who said it was illegal for anyone to compel her to do this work, and that she had a choice to leave. She decided to claim her dignity and quit.
  • Aug 25, 2014
    The Indian government should end “manual scavenging” – the cleaning of human waste by communities considered low-caste – by ensuring that local officials enforce the laws prohibiting this discriminatory practice, Human Rights Watch said in a new report released today.
  • Aug 24, 2014
    Irom Sharmila has been protesting against the Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA) for the last 14 years. Unfortunately, the debate over the Act has been reduced to an absurd test of patriotism: While some contend that repealing the Act would be an insult to the Indian army and would put the soldiers at risk, others feel that it has adversely affected Indian soldiers.
  • Aug 4, 2014
    Women and child development minister Maneka Gandhi’s decision to focus immediate attention on ending sexual violence against women and girls is good news. However, knee-jerk solutions like death penalty for rapists and lowering the age of a juvenile from 18 to 16 will not help end sexual violence against women.