• India has significant human rights problems despite making commitments to tackle some of the most prevalent abuses. There are increased restrictions on Internet freedom; continued marginalization of Dalits, tribal groups, religious minorities, sexual and gender minorities, and people with disabilities; and persistent impunity for abuses linked to insurgencies, particularly in Maoist areas, Jammu and Kashmir, Manipur, and Assam. Many children remain at risk of abuse and deprived of education. India’s free media, vibrant civil society, and independent judiciary often act as checks on abusive practices but reluctance to hold public officials to account for abuses or dereliction of duty fosters a culture of corruption and impunity. India continues to use laws to stifle dissent by restricting access to foreign funding for domestic nongovernmental organizations that are critical of the government.

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  • A resident sits on the floor in the women’s ward of Thane Mental Hospital, a 1,857-bed facility in the suburbs of Mumbai.
    (New Delhi) – Women and girls with disabilities in India are forced into mental hospitals and institutions, where they face unsanitary conditions, risk physical and sexual violence, and experience involuntary treatment, including electroshock therapy,Human Rights Watch said today. As one woman put it, they are “treated worse than animals.”

Reports

India

  • Dec 19, 2014
    Indian authorities should immediately investigate allegations that West Bengal police beat a rights activist and have been harassing his group for reporting on security force abuses.
  • Dec 16, 2014
  • Dec 14, 2014
    Women with psychosocial or intellectual disabilities are vulnerable to abuse and they have little say in what happens to them in institutions in India. To add to that, state institutions are often overcrowded, the sanitation and hygiene dismal, access to treatment and counselling poor, and rehabilitation efforts non-existent.For more than 70 million people with psychosocial disabilities — mental health conditions such as schizophrenia or depression — who live in India, access to mental health services is poor, with only 43 state-run mental hospitals across the country, three psychiatrists and 0.47 psychologists per million people. The few voluntary community-based services that do exist are short-staffed and lack resources.
  • Dec 3, 2014
    (New Delhi) – Women and girls with disabilities in India are forced into mental hospitals and institutions, where they face unsanitary conditions, risk physical and sexual violence, and experience involuntary treatment, including electroshock therapy,Human Rights Watch said today. As one woman put it, they are “treated worse than animals.”
  • Dec 3, 2014
    In India, many women and girls with intellectual and psychosocial disabilities are locked up in institutions against their will. Some of the institutions for those women, who have disabilities ranging from Down Syndrome and cerebral palsy to schizophrenia and depression, are filthy and overcrowded. Human Rights Watch’s Kriti Sharma spoke with Amy Braunschweiger about the 24 institutions she and other researchers visited across four Indian states – including government mental hospitals and government and private residential care facilities – for the new report, “’Treated Worse than Animals.’“ This is what they found.
  • Nov 15, 2014
  • Nov 12, 2014
  • Nov 4, 2014
    This week marks the 30th anniversary of the November 1984 anti-Sikh massacres in India. At least 3,000 Sikhs were killed throughout India in the span of just three days.
  • Oct 29, 2014
    Successive Indian governments’ failure to prosecute those most responsible for killings and other abuses during the 1984 anti-Sikh violence highlights India’s weak efforts to combat communal violence.
  • Oct 17, 2014
    They’re going to need an extra-big stage in Oslo this year. When Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai pick up their Nobel Peace Prizes, there are going to be a lot of other winners standing alongside them. About 2.2 billion, in fact.