• Aug 16, 2011
    Commentary
    When I interviewed 20-year-old Tun Tun Aung (not his real name) he had a bullet wound in his shoulder that had shattered his arm. He was shot escaping the Burmese army early this year, after weeks of service as a front-line porter. The army usually coerces civilians on Burma’s periphery into this work, forcing ethnic villagers to carry military supplies through conflict zones. For major military operations, however, they gather hundreds of convicted prisoners, who are considered more disposable. Many do not return.
  • Aug 11, 2010
    Press release
    European Union member states should publicly support the establishment of an international Commission of Inquiry into war crimes and crimes against humanity in Burma ahead of the United Nations General Assembly in September.
  • Oct 9, 2009
    Press release
    The award of the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize to US President Barack Obama should encourage him to apply his stated principles to both foreign and domestic human rights policy.
  • Apr 20, 2009
    Backgrounder Briefing
    Although the Security Council has identified six grave violations against children in armed conflict, to date it has focused primarily on the recruitment and use of child soldiers. Other violations affect much larger numbers of children, and result in terrible and long-lasting consequences, but have not received the same focused international response.
  • Oct 23, 2008
    Press release
    Asian and European governments meeting in China this week should press Burma to improve its human rights record.
  • Sep 7, 2008
    Commentary
    As a member of the United Nations security council for two years, South Africa has had many opportunities to speak out forcefully for human rights - or to join those speaking out against them. Again and again, it has chosen the latter course.
  • Jan 30, 2008
    Press release
    The established democracies are accepting flawed and unfair elections for political expediency, Human Rights Watch said today in releasing its World Report 2008. By allowing autocrats to pose as democrats, without demanding they uphold the civil and political rights that make democracy meaningful, the United States, the European Union and other influential democracies risk undermining human rights worldwide.