• Libya’s culture of impunity fueled widespread human rights abuses. Escalating armed conflict caused destruction of civilian property and unlawful killings that amounted to war crimes. Politically motivated assassinations, forced displacement, arbitrary detentions, inhumane torture, and violations of rights of detainees held under both state custody and under the control of militias remained unabated and may amount to crimes against humanity. Armed groups in eastern Libya affiliated with the Islamic State (ISIS), announced the establishment of an autonomous province divided into the Derna and Benghazi sectors. Trafficking of humans, drugs, and weapons into Chad, Sudan, Egypt, and Algeria had yet to be resolved.
  • The father of one of the Egyptian Coptic men killed in Libya mourns at a church before attending mass in El-Our village, in Minya governorate, south of Cairo, on February 16, 2015.
    The brutal killing of 21 mostly Egyptian Coptic Christians held captive by a Libyan extremist group was a war crime for which those responsible must be held to account. Libyan authorities should take immediate steps to bring the perpetrators to justice, to the extent that this is currently possible, and the United Nations should establish a mechanism to investigate and prosecute such crimes.

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Reports

Libya

  • Mar 5, 2015

    In the face of massive human rights abuses, the Human Rights Council has a responsibility to be part of the solution. It needs to resist the temptation to retreat into political and regional factionalism, to undermine the independence of your Office, High Commissioner, invoke selectivity to deflect attention from situations demanding international attention, or engage in procedural tactics to silence debate.

  • Feb 24, 2015
    At least seven civilians, including three children, died in the joint Egyptian/Libyan airstrikes on the eastern city of Derna on February 16, 2015. Libya and Egypt should conduct speedy and transparent investigations into the deaths.
  • Feb 16, 2015
    The brutal killing of 21 mostly Egyptian Coptic Christians held captive by a Libyan extremist group was a war crime for which those responsible must be held to account. Libyan authorities should take immediate steps to bring the perpetrators to justice, to the extent that this is currently possible, and the United Nations should establish a mechanism to investigate and prosecute such crimes.
  • Feb 9, 2015
    Various armed groups in Libya have violently attacked, kidnapped, intimidated, threatened, and killed Libyan journalists with impunity over the past two years, causing many to flee the country or impose self-censorship, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. At the same time, courts are prosecuting journalists and others for defaming public officials and other offenses that violate freedom of expression. The failure by successive governments and interim authorities to protect journalists has wiped out much of the limited media freedom that existed following the 2011 uprising that ousted the Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.
  • Jan 29, 2015
    Human rights conditions in Libya regressed sharply in 2014, reaching a low point since the end of the uprising that toppled Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, Human Rights Watch said today in its World Report 2015. The outbreak of new armed conflicts, combined with a further collapse of government authority in much of the country, eliminated any semblance of law and order from large parts of Libya.
  • Dec 5, 2014
    All countries should suspend any forcible returns of Libyans and third country nationals to Libya as they may face serious harm if forced to return there
  • Dec 1, 2014
  • Nov 27, 2014
    Armed militias that control the eastern city of Derna are terrorizing residents through summary executions, public floggings, and other violent abuse. The abuses are taking place in the absence of state authorities and the rule of law. The groups include some that have affiliated with the extremist group Islamic State (also known as ISIS).
  • Nov 21, 2014
    A Libyan criminal court’s imposition of a five-year prison term on Al-Ummah newspaper editor Amara al-Khatabi for allegedly defaming public officials is a serious blow to free speech that should not be allowed to stand.
  • Nov 11, 2014

    United Nations Security Council members should use the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor’s briefing on her Libya investigation on November 11, 2014, to express concern about the country’s deteriorating situation. Security Council members should underline the ICC’s ongoing jurisdiction to investigate grave abuses being committed by all sides.