• The fragile transition government failed to address multiple human rights challenges in 2013. Conflict-related abuses, legally sanctioned discrimination against women, judicial executions of child offenders, and non-accountability for the previous government’s human rights violations all persisted. Clashes continued between state security forces and armed factions demanding greater autonomy in southern Yemen and between Salafist groups and armed tribesmen and Huthis in the north. The Yemeni government and the United States continued to engage in military operations with the Islamist armed group Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP). Yemen continued to face a growing humanitarian crisis, with nearly half the population lacking sufficient food, according to UN agencies.
  • Yemeni authorities should immediately return the broadcasting equipment of the private TV station Yemen Today and permit it to resume broadcasting. Military forces raided the station, owned by former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, on June 11, 2014, following its coverage of protests in the streets of Sanaa, the capital.

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Reports

Yemen

  • Jul 7, 2014
    An exiled Ethiopian opposition leader unlawfully deported by Yemen back to Ethiopia is at risk of mistreatment including torture. Andargachew Tsige is secretary-general of Ginbot 7, a banned Ethiopian opposition organization, and was convicted and sentenced to death in absentia in separate trials in Ethiopia in 2009 and 2012.
  • Jul 1, 2014
    All parties implicated in a new United Nations’ report about abuses of children during armed conflict should call an immediate halt to these crimes, Human Rights Watch said today. The UN secretary-general’s annual report on children in armed conflict was released on July 1, 2014.
  • Jun 26, 2014
    “They would tie my hands behind my back and lay me down on the ground,” was what “Said” told me, describing the torture camp near Yemen’s coast where he spent seven days before the traffickers holding him sold him to another gang. “Then they would beat me with sticks,” he said as he showed me the scars across his back. “I saw the guards kick the face of one man who was on the floor, breaking his teeth.”
  • Jun 22, 2014
    Yemeni authorities should immediately return the broadcasting equipment of the private TV station Yemen Today and permit it to resume broadcasting. Military forces raided the station, owned by former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, on June 11, 2014, following its coverage of protests in the streets of Sanaa, the capital.
  • Jun 21, 2014
    Yemen should uphold the commitments it made during its rights review before the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva. These include ratifying the Rome Statute to join the International Criminal Court (ICC), establishing a commission of inquiry into rights violations committed during the 2011 uprising, and adopting measures to promote the equality of women.
  • Jun 19, 2014
    Human Rights Watch has documented the lack of effective accountability processes to address past human rights violations and numerous attacks on journalists, particularly those trying to write about government corruption at all levels. Human Rights Watch also has documented government forces’ use of landmines in 2011, a serious violation of Yemen’s obligations to destroy all landmine caches and refrain from their use in all circumstances.
  • Jun 10, 2014
    Late one night last fall, I sat on a half-rotten mattress in a desolate square in the northern Yemeni town of Haradh as a 20-year-old high school student from a rural Ethiopian town — let’s call him Shikuri — told me his story. He had left home to find work in Saudi Arabia, but when he landed in Yemen en route, he found himself caught up in unimaginable horror.
  • May 25, 2014

    Most Yemenis were at home taking their afternoon siesta when Belkis Wille, the Human Rights Watch Yemen researcher, walked into the shop in Haradh for the meeting she had arranged with Nadim. The shop owner, a friend of Nadim’s, took her to the back office to wait. The heat in the dusty desert town was stifling, and the shop was hardly better – Haradh had almost no electricity, and air conditioning wasn’t an option. Shortly after Belkis arrived, a round man in his 40s walked through the door. He stood with his back to her, shifting his weight from one foot to the other. He seemed nervous, glancing frequently around the room.

    Nadim (not his real name) had reason for both the jangled nerves and the caution. His line of business – human trafficking – meant that meeting with Belkis put him in peril.

  • May 25, 2014
    Traffickers in Yemen hold African migrants in detention camps, torturing them to extort payment from their families, with the complicity of local officials, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Sometimes the torture ends in death. The Yemeni government should vigorously investigate and prosecute human traffickers and members of the security forces involved in the abuses.
  • May 22, 2014