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Muslim and Christian Preachers Face Prison Under Abusive Law

Indonesian National Police have separately arrested and detained two clergymen on blasphemy charges. On August 25 Muhammad Kece, a Christian preacher, was arrested at his friend’s house in Bali for alleged blasphemy against Islam. Among other…
(L-R) Muhammed Kece, Yahya Waoni
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Amend Discriminatory Regulation That Blocks New Houses of Worship

Hundreds of Muslims in Indonesia this week demanded that the local government in Sraten village, East Java, stop the Muhammadiyah congregation from building a mosque. The protest prompted the village head to order the construction halted until the…
Indonesia's religious minorities, including Christians, Ahmadis, Buddhists and native faith believers, celebrate Indonesia’s Independence Day outside the State Palace in Jakarta
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Arrest Assailants, Protect Religious Minorities

On November 27, Islamist militants attacked the Christian-majority village of Lembantongoa in Sulawesi, Indonesia, killing the village elder and three other Christian farmers. The attackers burned a Salvation Army church and six houses, prompting…
Villagers and police officers clean up debris at the site of suspected militant attack in Lembantongoa village in Sulawesi, Indonesia, November 30, 2020. 
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Revoke New Provisions Violating Basic Rights

Indonesia is set to expand its abusive blasphemy laws as part of an overhaul of the country’s Criminal Code. In September President Joko Widodo ordered parliament to postpone voting on the draft Criminal Code to allow more time for…
Muslim protesters display flags with Arabic writings that read: "There's no God but Allah and Muhammad is his messenger"
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Constitutional Court Ruling a Blow Against Religious Freedom

Indonesia’s Constitutional Court dealt a blow to Indonesia’s already fragile religious freedom when it dismissed a petition to revoke the country’s blasphemy law. The petition was filed by nine members of Indonesia’s persecuted Ahmadiyah…
The Ahmadiyah mosque in Depok, West Java ordered sealed by local police to "protect" Ahmadiyah from attacks by militant Islamists, June 2017.
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Constitutional Court Recognizes ‘Native Faith’ ID Card Category

Indonesia’s beleaguered religious minority groups got some rare good news today. The Constitutional Court ruled that the Population Administration Law’s prohibition on adherents of native faiths from listing their religion on…
Members of Indonesia's religious minorities, including native faith believers, celebrate Indonesia’s Independence Day outside the State Palace, August 2016.
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Laws Restrict Adoptions of Unknown Children to ‘Religion of the Majority’

Christians and other religious minorities need not apply. That’s the message conveyed to policewoman Ida Maharani Hutagaol in Binjal, in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province, when she applied to adopt an abandoned infant she had helped…
201710Asia_Indonesia_Adoption
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Government Rejects UN Members’ Concerns Over Country’s Blasphemy Law

The Indonesian government has just made it clear that the country’s dangerously ambiguous blasphemy law is here to stay – which is bad news for beleaguered religious minorities. During the United Nation’s periodic review of…
Two men hold the Indonesian flag as the compound of the Gafatar sect burns after being set on fire by local villagers, at Antibar village, West Kalimantan province, on January 19, 2016.
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‘Strange Teachings’ Reap a 30-Month Prison Term

Indonesian authorities wielding the country’s dangerously ambiguous blasphemy law have claimed another victim: Siti Aisyah, the owner of an Islamic school in Mataram, Lombok Island. On Monday, a Mataram court sentenced Aisyah to 30…
Indonesia
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Government Targeting of Hizbut Tahrir Curtails Free Speech, Association

The Indonesian government today ordered the disbanding of Hizbut Tahrir, a conservative Islamist group that supports the creation of a Sharia-based Islamic caliphate to replace the country’s pluralist democracy. The government sought to…
A masked member of the Islamic group Hizbut Tahrir Indonesia takes part in a rally in Makassar, South Sulawesi, November 1, 2009.
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Conversion Requirement for National ID Cards Prompts Protest

Indonesia’s besieged Ahmadiyah religious community is fighting back. Earlier this week, representatives of the religious minority from Manislor district in West Java’s Kuningan regency filed a formal complaint against a local…
The Ahmadiyah mosque in Depok, West Java ordered sealed by local police to "protect" Ahmadiyah from attacks by militant Islamists, June 2017.
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Discriminatory Laws Put Religious Minorities at Risk

Indonesian authorities have invoked the country’s discriminatory blasphemy law to destroy the political career of former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama and will now send him to prison. On Tuesday, a Jakarta court…
Jakarta's first non-Muslim governor and Chinese-ethnic minority, Basuki Tjahaja Purnama also known as Ahok, arrives in court for his verdict in Jakarta, Indonesia May 9, 2017.
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Repeal of Discriminatory, Brutal Bylaws Long Overdue

Authorities in Indonesia’s Aceh province imposed the Sharia, or Islamic law, punishment of multiple lashes of a cane against 339 people in 2016, the first full-year of implementation of Aceh’s Sharia’s Criminal Code since it went into effect in September…
Murni Amris, an Acehnese woman, is caned as part of her sentence in the courtyard of a mosque in Aceh Besar district, Indonesia's Aceh province October 1, 2010.
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Police, Militant Islamists Implicated in Religious Freedom Abuses

Acts of religious intolerance and violations of religious freedom increased in Indonesia in 2016, with the country’s religious minorities bearing the brunt of the rise. The Setara Institute, a Jakarta-based organization that monitors religious…
Two men hold the Indonesian flag as the compound of the Gafatar sect burns after being set on fire by local villagers, at Antibar village, West Kalimantan province, on January 19, 2016.
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Yesterday, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia inked an agreement that says Indonesian women working in Saudi homes will be able to keep their passports, communicate with their families, get paid monthly, and have time off. The new pact comes in the wake of years…