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Government financial support for fossil fuels, including through subsidies, presents a key obstacle to achieving emissions reductions urgently needed to address the climate crisis. Subsidies artificially reduce the costs of fossil fuel production and…
Pumpjacks at an oil well site near Epping, N.D., Oct. 1, 2018. © 2018 Jim Wilson/The New York Times/GDA via AP Images
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Well before the Covid-19 pandemic, Stephen Miller, White House adviser to then-US President Donald Trump, floated the idea of using the government’s public health authority as a means of achieving the administration’s long-pursued goal of closing the…
An asylum seeking family from Guatemala stands on the Paso del Norte international bridge. After border agents turned the family away at the port of entry, the family swam across the Rio Grande.
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The economic fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic has severely affected tenants and has led to widespread housing insecurity in the United States. Almost all US states acted quickly to protect renters, and by May 2020, 43 states had active eviction…
Tenants’ rights advocates demonstrate in front of the Edward W. Brook Courthouse in Boston
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12 Foreign Policy Priorities for the Next Administration

The United States should strive to be a world leader on human rights. Human Rights Watch offers 12 priorities for the next US administration to create a rights-focused foreign policy. The United States has the power, influence, and resources to create…
Le président élu des États-Unis, Joe Biden, s’adressait à des partisans lors d’un rassemblement tenu dans le stade « Heinz Field » à Pittsburgh, en Pennsylvanie, le 2 novembre 2020, à la veille de l’élection.
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This Q & A from Human Rights Watch explains what human rights law says about how federal elections are administered in the United States including whether or not the process for certifying election results is aligned with international standards. It…
A man in a beanie and face mask stands in front of a sign that says "Vote Here"
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    This Q&A addresses key questions regarding the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the relationship between the court and the United States. 1. What is the International Criminal Court? 2. Is the US a member…
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On January 31, 2020, the administration of President Donald Trump announced the reversal of US prohibitions on landmine production and use. The decision nullifies years of steps by the US to align its policy and practice with the 1997 treaty banning…
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On January 25, 2019, the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the implementation of the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the “Remain in Mexico” program. The policy allows US border officers to return non-…
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Summary of Findings from HRW’s Report, “‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

Juanita Hernandez was arrested following a heated argument with her boyfriend and taken to the Tulsa County jail. Though prosecutors either dismissed her case or did not file it at all, she remained in the jail, having been turned over…
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers conduct a targeted enforcement operation in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. on February 9, 2017.
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Summary of Findings from HRW’s Report, “‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

Tulsa Demographics: Half of all black people in Tulsa, live in North Tulsa[1], but North Tulsa is only 21 percent of the total population. The population of North Tulsa is 35.7 percent black. …
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Summary of Findings from HRW’s Report, “‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

In the wake of the killing of Terence Crutcher, an unarmed black man, by a Tulsa police officer in September 2016, Human Rights Watch conducted an investigation into everyday policing in Tulsa, looking at its impact on people of…
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Summary of Findings from HRW’s Report,“‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

Oppressive Court Debt   People who get arrested for alleged crimes or ticketed for infractions must go to court. At court, they are assessed various fines, fees, and court costs. Fines, paid to the court, are…
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Summary of Findings from Human Rights Watch’s Report “‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

  In the wake of high-profile killings by Tulsa Police, including the killing of Terence Crutcher, Tulsans have advocated for reform to address racial bias and police violence. Mayor Bynum and other city leaders…
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Summary of Findings from Human Rights Watch’s Report, “‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

The deaths of Joshua Barre, shot and killed by Tulsa police officers and sheriff’s deputies, and Joshua Harvey, who lost consciousness and later died after being tasered multiple times by Tulsa officers, point to the dangers of having…
201909US_Tulsa_main
News

Summary of Findings from HRW’s Report, “‘Get on the Ground!’: Policing, Poverty, and Racial Inequality in Tulsa, Oklahoma”

  Juanita Hernandez was arrested following a heated argument with her boyfriend and taken to the Tulsa County jail. Though prosecutors either dismissed her case or did not file it at all, she remained in the jail…
201909US_Tulsa_main
News
On April 6, 2018, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new “zero-tolerance” policy intended to ramp-up criminal prosecution of people caught entering the United States illegally. Soon afterward, news outlets began to report that unauthorized…
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