Reports

Impact of the “War on Drugs” on Children in the Philippines

The 48-page report, “‘Our Happy Family Is Gone’: Impact of the ‘War on Drugs’ on Children in the Philippines,” details the plight of children whose parents or guardians have been killed. Many children have suffered psychological distress, and all experienced economic hardship made worse by the death of a family breadwinner. The increased poverty and trauma have led many children to leave school or compelled them to work. Some children who lost a family member have faced bullying in their school and community. Some were forced to live on the streets.

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  • Systemic Discrimination Against Transgender Women in Lebanon

    Lebanese General Security has banned a group of activists and academics from re-entering Lebanon following their participation in a September 2018 conference on gender and sexuality, Human Rights Watch, the Arab Foundation for Freedoms and Equality (AFE), and Legal Agenda said today.

  • Corporal Punishment in Lebanon’s Schools

    This report finds that children suffer from corporal punishment at school because of a lack of accountability for the abusers.

  • Mass Evictions of Syrian Refugees by Lebanese Municipalities

    This report documents inconsistencies in the reasons municipalities have given for expelling Syrians and the failure of the central government to protect refugees’ rights. United Nations officials identified 3,664 such evictions from 2016 through the first quarter of 2018.

  • Barriers to Education for Children with Disabilities in Lebanon

    This report finds that although Lebanese law bars schools from discriminating against children with disabilities, public and private schools exclude many children with disabilities.

  • The Health Risks of Burning Waste in Lebanon

    This report finds that Lebanese authorities’ lack of effective action to address widespread open burning of waste and a lack of adequate monitoring or information about the health effects violate Lebanon’s obligations under international law.

  • Lack of Transparency in Donor Funding for Syrian Refugee Education

    This report tracks pledges made at a conference in London in February 2016.

  • The Trial of Civilians by Military Courts in Lebanon

    This report documents the due process deficiencies inherent in trying civilians before military courts, the use of confessions extracted under torture, and allegations that Ministry of Defense or army officials have used the courts’ broad jurisdiction to intimidate individuals or retaliate against critical speech or acti

  • Barriers to Education for Syrian Refugee Children in Lebanon

    This report documents the important steps Lebanon has taken to allow Syrian children to access public schools. But Human Rights Watch found that some schools have not complied with enrollment policies, and that more donor support is needed for Syrian families and for Lebanon’s over-stretched public school system.

  • How Lebanon’s Residency Rules Facilitate Abuse of Syrian Refugees

    This report is based on interviews with more than 60 Syrian refugees, lawyers, and humanitarian workers assisting refugees in Lebanon. Human Rights Watch found that residency regulations adopted in January 2015 have resulted in most Syrians losing their legal status.

  • Women’s Rights under Lebanese Personal Status Laws

    This 114-page report found that, across all religions, personal status laws erect greater barriers for women than men who wish to terminate unhappy or abusive marriages, initiate divorce proceedings, ensure their rights concerning their children after divorce, or secure pecuniary rights from a former spouse.

  • Ill-treatment and Torture of Vulnerable Groups in Lebanese Police Stations

    This 66-page report focuses on torture and ill-treatment by the Internal Security Forces (ISF), particularly the Drug Repression Bureau and members of the ISF who enforce “morality-related” laws against drug users, sex workers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

  • Protecting Civilians through the Convention on Cluster Munitions

    This book is the culmination of a decade of research by Human Rights Watch.

  • How the Lebanese Justice System Fails Migrant Domestic Workers

    This 54-page report reviews 114 Lebanese judicial decisions affecting migrant domestic workers. It finds that lack of accessible complaint mechanisms, lengthy judicial procedures, and restrictive visa policies dissuade many workers from filing or pursuing complaints against their employers.
  • Protection of Migrant Domestic Workers in Asia and the Middle East

    This 26-page report reviews conditions in eight countries with large numbers of migrant domestic workers: Lebanon, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Singapore, and Malaysia.

  • Israel’s Use of Cluster Munitions in Lebanon in July and August 2006

    In this 131-page report, Human Rights Watch found that Israel violated international humanitarian law in its indiscriminate and disproportionate cluster munition attacks on Lebanon. The report provides the most comprehensive and detailed account yet of the nature and impact of Israel’s use of cluster munitions.