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  • RWANDA

    THE CRISIS CONTINUES

    One year after the genocide began in Rwanda, the crisis continues. Despite calls for justice inside and outside the country, no criminal trials, national or international, have taken place. The Rwandan government is now arresting some 1,500 persons a week, producing life-threatening overcrowding and appalling treatment in the prisons and fostering insecurity among the population at large.

  • Crossing the Line

    Human Rights Abuses Along the U.S. Border with Mexico Persist Amid Climate of Impunity

    U.S. Border Patrol agents are committing serious human rights violations, including unjustified shootings, rapes and beatings, while enjoying virtual impunity for their actions.

  • “Germany for Germans”

    Xenophobia and Racist Violence in Germany

    Germany has been confronted with a disturbing escalation in violent crimes against those who are different, and especially those who are perceived as not ethnic German during the period since unification. Racism that is endemic in many societies has exploded in a public way in Germany.

  • The Crisis Continues

    One year after the genocide began in Rwanda, the crisis continues. Despite calls for justice, no criminal trials, national or international, have taken place. As of April 1995, the Rwandan government was arresting some 1,500 persons a week, producing life-threatening overcrowding and appalling treatment in the prisons and fostering insecurity among the population at large.

  • Somalia Faces the Future

    Human Rights in a Fragmented Society

    The departure of the last U.N. troops of the Somalia operation in March 1995 marks a critical juncture for Somalia, and for international peacekeeping. In researching this report, we set out to discover what would be left behind when the U.N.

  • Playing the "Communal Card"

    Communal Violence and Human Rights

    The current epidemic of communal violence--violence involving groups that define themselves by their differences of religion, ethnicity, language or race--is today's paramount human rights problem.

  • Security Compromised: Recycled Haitian Soldiers on the Police Front Line

    As the multinational force prepared to turn over operations to the U.N. Mission in Haiti (UNMIH) on March 31, 1995, political tensions increased and far from having brought stability, the U.S.-led force pointed only to a fragile security that impending parliamentary and presidential elections may rupture.

  • Prison Conditions in Japan

    Prisoners in Japan face routine violations of human rights from the moment of arrest through the end of their prison term. After being apprehended, Japanese suspects are placed in police detention (daiyo-kangoku) where they face severe pressure, often involving physical abuse, in order to obtain confessions.

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