Universal Periodic Review - Human Rights Council
April 15, 2015

Summary

This submission outlines Human Rights Watch’s concerns about the human rights situation in Rwanda since the country’s 2011 Universal Periodic Review (UPR). It notes positive developments and highlights ongoing concerns.

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April 8, 2015

 

This was submitted by Human Rights Watch for the Universal Periodic Review of the United Nations Human Rights Council in September 2014 and updated on April 8, 2015.

UPR Submission

United States

April 1, 2015

Summary

Lebanon accepted many recommendations following its first UPR review in 2010 but has failed to make progress on a number of them.

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March 23, 2015

In Nepal’s submission for its Universal Periodic Review in January 2011, the government emphasized the fragility of transition from conflict and a dedication to ensuring a robust democracy characterized by a “rights-based approach” in “national policies, plans, and laws.”[1]

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March 23, 2015

Human Rights Watch submits the following information on five areas of concern regarding Australia’s human rights record: protection of asylum seekers and refugees, counterterrorism, indigenous rights, rights of people with disabilities, and same-sex marriage equality.

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March 17, 2015

Human Rights Watch considera positiva la posibilidad de debatir sobre la situación de los derechos humanos en Bolivia en ocasión de su segundo Examen Periódico Universal (EPU), durante el cual se abordaron una variedad de asuntos de interés como las restricciones al trabajo de defensores de derechos humanos, la impunidad de violaciones de derechos humanos, los per&ia

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Human Rights Watch's Submission to the Human Rights Council
March 16, 2015
Human Rights Watch's Submission to the Human Rights Council

Human Rights Watch welcomes the opportunity to discuss human rights in Bolivia during its second Universal Periodic Review (UPR), which addressed a range of concerns, including restrictions on the work of human rights defenders, impunity for human rights violations, excessive pretrial detention, and limitations to children’s and women’s rights.

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Updated January 2015
January 16, 2015
Updated January 2015

(Updates highlighted in bold)

The government of Laos continues to severely restrict fundamental rights including freedom of speech, association, and assembly. Since 2010 the government has arbitrarily arrested and detained, and in at least two cases forcibly disappeared civil society activists and those deemed critical of the government.

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