• Jul 15, 2014
  • Nov 29, 2013
    On World AIDS Day, December 1, 2013, Human Rights Watch and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network will honor Alternatives-Cameroun and the Grandmothers Advocacy Network (GRAN) with the 2013 Award for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights. This is the 12th year that the two nongovernmental organizations have jointly presented awards to individuals or groups for their work on human rights in the fight against HIV.

Reports

  • Human Rights Violations in the Enforcement of Cameroon’s Anti-Homosexuality Law
  • Rights Abuses in Cameroon based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
  • A Call for Action on HIV/AIDS-Related Human Rights Abuses Against Women and Girls in Africa

Cameroon

  • Jul 15, 2014
  • Nov 29, 2013
    On World AIDS Day, December 1, 2013, Human Rights Watch and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network will honor Alternatives-Cameroun and the Grandmothers Advocacy Network (GRAN) with the 2013 Award for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights. This is the 12th year that the two nongovernmental organizations have jointly presented awards to individuals or groups for their work on human rights in the fight against HIV.
  • Sep 24, 2013
    Cameroon’s ambassador to Geneva, Anatole Nkou, told the United Nations Human Rights Council on September 20, 2013, that a murdered human rights defender was killed because of his “personal life.”
  • Sep 20, 2013
    In a context marked by severe violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people and human rights defenders working with them, it is shameful that Cameroon has rejected nearly all recommendations related to sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • Sep 12, 2013
  • Sep 12, 2013
  • Jul 17, 2013
    I last saw Eric Ohena Lembembe in March, on a sticky, humid evening in Yaoundé. We had released a joint report on human rights abuses against people accused of homosexual conduct in Cameroon two days earlier. The head of the gendarmerie – Cameroon’s military police – had finally agreed to meet with us. We wanted to raise the many cases we had documented of arbitrary arrests, ill-treatment and torture of people alleged to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. Eric had recently been named executive director of CAMFAIDS, a young civil society organization in Yaoundé. Its mission is to defend the rights of both LGBT people and those infected with and affected by HIV/AIDS. Eric was smart, full of creative plans and a fierceness needed in Cameroon, where homosexual conduct is criminalized. People are arrested frequently and can get up to five years in prison. As a gay man whose activism had made him increasingly open about his identity – a bold stance in Cameroon – it was one of Eric’s goals to change this injustice.
  • Jul 16, 2013
    Cameroonian authorities should immediately conduct an effective and thorough investigation into the torture and killing of Eric Ohena Lembembe, an activist and journalist who was found dead at his home in Yaoundé on the evening of July 15. Lembembe, executive director of the Cameroonian Foundation for AIDS (CAMFAIDS), was an outspoken activist who defended the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) people.
  • Jul 1, 2013
    The Cameroonian government should rigorously investigate, denounce, and prosecute suspicious break-ins at three human rights defenders’ offices in June, six Cameroonian and international human rights organizations said today. The organizations – Affirmative Action, Alternatives-Cameroun, the Association for the Defense of Homosexuals (ADEFHO), the Cameroonian Foundation for AIDS (CAMFAIDS), Human Rights Watch, and Humanity First Cameroon – said that those attacked included organizations working with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) community.
  • May 16, 2013
    Jonas and Franky, who identify as women, were arrested in July 2011 by police who stopped their vehicle and saw that they were dressed in women’s clothing. Police claimed that Jonas, Franky, and a third person were “groping” each other in the car. They were convicted of homosexual conduct in November 2011 by a judge who suggested that because they were drinking Bailey’s liqueur the night of the arrest – which the judge considered a “women’s drink” –they must be homosexual.