• Upon taking office in December 2012, President Enrique Peña Nieto acknowledged that the “war on drugs” launched by predecessor Felipe Calderón had led to serious abuses by the security forces. Yet the government has made little progress in prosecuting widespread killings, enforced disappearances, and torture committed by soldiers and police in the course of efforts to combat organized crime, including during Peña Nieto’s tenure. 

  • A woman holds a flyer with a photo and information on one of the missing 43 students of the Ayotzinapa teachers' training college, during a demonstration in Mexico City.
    The Mexican government delayed investigations into the enforced disappearances of 43 students in Iguala, Guerrero State, and the killing of 22 people in Tlatlaya, Mexico State. In the Tlatlaya case, state prosecutors sought to cover up military wrongdoing by coercing false testimony from witnesses.

Reports

Mexico

  • Mar 27, 2015
    The White House has been trying to stem the flow of unaccompanied children into the U.S. from Mexico. Steve Inskeep talks to Human Rights Watch's Bill Felick and the State Department's Simon Henshaw.
  • Jan 12, 2015
    More children work in agriculture than in any other industry in the world. But the scale and complexity of the problem is no excuse for tolerating a practice that traps children in multi-generational cycles of poverty, or, worse, leaves them injured, maimed, or dead.
  • Jan 5, 2015
  • Jan 5, 2015
    US President Barack Obama should press President Enrique Peña Nieto to address Mexico’s failure to investigate and prosecute egregious abuses by Mexican security forces.
  • Dec 10, 2014
    (Mexico City) – The Mexican Health Ministry took an important step on December 09, 2014, to ensure access to palliative care for people suffering from pain due to incurable illness, Human Rights Watch said today. The government released long-awaited guidelines to its healthcare system that will operationalize provisions on end-of-life care outlined in Mexico’s 2009 health law.
  • Nov 18, 2014
  • Nov 7, 2014
    The Mexican government delayed investigations into the enforced disappearances of 43 students in Iguala, Guerrero State, and the killing of 22 people in Tlatlaya, Mexico State. In the Tlatlaya case, state prosecutors sought to cover up military wrongdoing by coercing false testimony from witnesses.
  • Oct 28, 2014
    Mexico, like much of the developing world, is facing a growing public health challenge – more people will be dying from chronic illnesses like cancer, heart disease and diabetes that often cause extreme pain. In 2009, Mexico passed a progressive law granting patients given less than six months to live access to palliative care, which focuses on treating pain and other symptoms. Palliative care is relatively low costAnchor – medicines such as morphine costs pennies per dose, although training staff can be more costly – and it can allow people to re-engage with life and pass away with dignity. Despite this law, little changed for Mexico’s terminally ill – at least at first. Associate Health Director Diederik Lohman talks about how Mexico came to embrace the necessity of pain relief, his work on palliative care around the world, and how it can give the terminally ill an opportunity for joy and meaning at the end of life.
  • Oct 24, 2014
    (Mexico City) – Tens of thousands of patients with terminal illnesses in Mexico suffer unnecessarily from severe pain and other symptoms because they cannot access adequate end-of-life care, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today.
  • Oct 8, 2014