• Apr 27, 2015
  • Apr 21, 2015
    New York University (NYU)’s pledge to compensate migrant construction workers for its Abu Dhabi campus who were excluded from a code of conduct designed to protect them is a positive step. The NYU president, John Sexton, announced the commitment on April 16, 2015, after a report commissioned by the Abu Dhabi government revealed the existence of a policy that excluded 30 to 35 percent of the workers from the guidelines and compliance monitoring requirements in a code of conduct covering migrant workers.

Reports

  • Palestinian Child Labor in Israeli Agricultural Settlements in the West Bank
  • Ill-Treatment of Sub-Saharan African Migrants in Morocco
  • Exploitation of Migrant Workers Ahead of Russia’s 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi

Exploitation, Forced Labor & Trafficking

  • May 12, 2015
    EU countries can start by increasing the number of refugees they resettle, granting more humanitarian visas, and easing restrictions on family reunification.
  • Apr 27, 2015
  • Apr 21, 2015
    New York University (NYU)’s pledge to compensate migrant construction workers for its Abu Dhabi campus who were excluded from a code of conduct designed to protect them is a positive step. The NYU president, John Sexton, announced the commitment on April 16, 2015, after a report commissioned by the Abu Dhabi government revealed the existence of a policy that excluded 30 to 35 percent of the workers from the guidelines and compliance monitoring requirements in a code of conduct covering migrant workers.
  • Mar 30, 2015
  • Mar 20, 2015
    What happens when a world-class institution dedicated to the free exchange of ideas meets up with a government that doesn’t share those values?
  • Feb 23, 2015
    The House of Lords should amend the Modern Slavery Bill to restore the right for migrant domestic workers to change employers, Human Rights Watch and the United Kingdom charity Kalayaan said today. The bill is being considered in the House of Lords, the UK’s upper chamber of parliament, during the week of February 23, 2015.
  • Feb 10, 2015
    Serious concerns about workers’ rights have not been resolved for a high-profile project in Abu Dhabi that will host branches of the Louvre and Guggenheim museums and a campus of New York University (NYU), Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. These institutions should make their continued engagement with the Saadiyat Island project contingent on the developers’ commitment to more serious enforcement of worker protections and the compensation of workers who suffered abuses, including those arbitrarily deported after they went on strike.
  • Jan 29, 2015
    The UAE authorities in 2014 aggressively restricted the rights of freedom of expression, association, and assembly, cracking down on dissidents and anyone considered a threat to national security, Human Rights Watch said today in its World Report 2015. The authorities also failed to investigate credible allegations that security forces arbitrarily detained and tortured dissidents.
  • Jan 21, 2015
    Thai agricultural workers in Israel face serious labor rights abuses because Israeli authorities are failing to enforce their own laws, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. Israeli authorities should take immediate steps to improve its enforcement mechanisms and investigate whether unsatisfactory living and working conditions have contributed to a troubling pattern of deaths among migrant workers from Thailand.
  • Jan 11, 2015
    There have been some encouraging reforms in Kuwait since its last UPR in 2010. For example, in January 2013 a judicial decision granted women the right to apply for posts as prosecutors, allowing them to therefore enter the career path to become judges eventually. However Kuwait has yet to reform any of the provisions in its personal status laws that discriminate against women.