• More than 100,000 Bidun who have lived in Kuwait for generations are denied citizenship and basic civil and political rights. Authorities have violently dispersed Bidun demonstrations and prosecuted protesters, saying only “Kuwaiti citizens” have the right to protest. Although citizenship claims have yet to be addressed adequately, authorities did promise the Bidun some benefits guaranteed to its citizens, such as free education and health care. As a general matter, authorities have increased internet surveillance. The Ministry of Interior said it will suspend all anonymous Twitter accounts, hoping to force users to disclose their real names. Authorities have detained and prosecuted people for using nonviolent political speech on social media.

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Reports

Kuwait

  • May 22, 2015
    EU High Representative Federica Mogherini should publicly urge Gulf countries to release immediately and unconditionally activists detained for exercising their rights.
  • May 12, 2015
    President Obama should urge the leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) to show greater respect for human rights when he meets them on May 13 and 14, 2015, to discuss partnership and security, Human Rights Watch said today.
  • May 5, 2015
    I write in anticipation of your meeting with the leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) on May 13 and 14, 2015 to urge that you press them to show greater respect for their citizens’ rights to free expression, association, peaceful assembly, and nationality.
  • Mar 29, 2015
    Kuwaiti authorities broke up an opposition protest in Kuwait City on March 23, 2015, and detained 16 protesters.
  • Mar 26, 2015
    What to do with the Bidun, the one hundred thousand plus people that the Kuwait government claims are "illegal residents" and considers stateless? Now, it seems, Kuwait's rulers have come up with a solution to the "problem" of the Bidun, whose lack of citizenship rights despite historic ties to the country has frequently led to international criticism. Put simply, the idea seems to be to pay other countries to accord them rights that Kuwait itself will not.
  • Feb 3, 2015
    Kuwait’s government has in the past year escalated punishments against people critical of the government, Human Rights Watch said today as it released its World Report 2015.
  • Jan 12, 2015
    Kuwait should drop the charges against the former lawmaker, Saleh al-Mulla, over critical tweets he sent before an official visit by President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi of Egypt.
  • Jan 11, 2015
    There have been some encouraging reforms in Kuwait since its last UPR in 2010. For example, in January 2013 a judicial decision granted women the right to apply for posts as prosecutors, allowing them to therefore enter the career path to become judges eventually. However Kuwait has yet to reform any of the provisions in its personal status laws that discriminate against women.
  • Oct 19, 2014
    Kuwaiti authorities have announced the third batch of citizenship revocations this year, during a general crackdown on dissent. The group of 18 revocations announced on September 29, 2014, which the authorities said was based on a cabinet decision, included one that appeared politically motivated. A total of 33 people have lost their citizenship during 2014, of which three are thought to be for political reasons.
  • Aug 20, 2014
    Kuwait’s new telecommunications law gives the government sweeping powers to block content, deny access to the Internet, and revoke licenses without giving reasons. The government should amend the law to limit the restrictions on telecommunication providers and users to no more than what international human rights law permits.