• Jun 9, 2011
    Governments, trade unions, and employers' organizations should combat child labor by adopting a new international treaty on the rights of domestic workers.
  • Jul 27, 2006
    Domestic workers face a wide range of grave abuses and labor exploitation, including physical and sexual abuse, forced confinement, non-payment of wages, denial of food and health care and excessive working hours with no rest days.

Reports

Togo

  • Jun 9, 2011
    Governments, trade unions, and employers' organizations should combat child labor by adopting a new international treaty on the rights of domestic workers.
  • Mar 11, 2008
    Human Rights Watch writes to urge Dr. Ihsanoglu to use his position as Secretary General of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference to support measures at the upcoming Summit of the Organisation of Islamic Conference in Dakar, Senegal on March 13-14 that would improve and strengthen the 1999 OIC Convention on Combating International Terrorism.
  • Jul 27, 2006
    Domestic workers face a wide range of grave abuses and labor exploitation, including physical and sexual abuse, forced confinement, non-payment of wages, denial of food and health care and excessive working hours with no rest days.
  • Sep 12, 2005
    Children around the world face systematic barriers to schooling that are undermining global progress towards universal primary education.
  • Dec 1, 2003
    Violence and discrimination against women and girls is fueling Africa’s AIDS crisis. African governments must make gender equality a central part of national AIDS programs if they are to succeed in fighting the epidemic.
  • Jul 2, 2003
    U.S. President George W. Bush will be traveling to Africa from July 7-12, visiting Senegal, South Africa, Botswana, Uganda, and Nigeria. This packet from Human Rights Watch includes material for each stop along the way.
  • Apr 1, 2003
    West African governments are failing to address a rampant traffic in child labor that could worsen with the region’s growing AIDS crisis.
  • Jun 13, 2002
    Human Rights Watch writes to the foreign and justice ministers of a number of African states and those of states that played a leading role in creating the Sierra Leone Special Court, stressing the importance of cooperation with the court. In particular, it is crucial that any country to which someone indicted by the Special Court has fled return that indictee to Sierra Leone. The perpetrators of truly horrific crimes should not be permitted to escape justice by fleeing from the state where the crime occurred.